Hong Kongers Vote to Return to a British Overseas Territory

In light of the Falkland Islands’ referendum result, South China Morning Post, a local English language newspaper, posted a poll on its website on 12th March 2013 around 13.00, asking the Hong Kongers whether they’d vote to return to a British overseas territory, given the option. The number is similar to the Falkland Islanders’ – an overwhelmingly “YES” – 90% as of 15.31 on 13th March 2013 (just over 24 hours).Image

 

This poll isn’t the most sophisticated, nor is it well thought out given the fact that “independence” is not one of the options. It is, however, a clear evidence of the discontentment fellow Hong Kongers have due to the continuous and increasingly aggressive interference of the PRC China government, which is a clear breach of 1-Country-2-System policy and the Sino-British Join Declaration.

There are people and groups on Facebook and other social media saying that if given the option, at least over 50% of the Hong Kongers would vote for independence.

This is not just an alarming sign to the Hong Kong SAR and PRC governments, but also a signal of the upraise of self identity and political awareness of Hong Kongers.

Will Hong Kongers finally stand up against a totalitarian and the unjust being done back in the 80s when the Brits and the Chinese decided Hong Kongers’ faith and future without asking their consent?

There are discussions and intense debates about the “Occupy Central” notion first raised by a law faculty professor. His proposal is rather interesting: basically people have to turn themselves in before action by signing a “declaration”. Not that violence is encouraged by those who opposed this “proposal” but many criticise whether surrendering and notifying the authorities about this “non-corporation” movement.

2012 Report to Congress U.S.-CHINA ECONOMIC AND SECURITY REVIEW COMMISSION

I bumped into a Cantonese blog yesterday, and think this is a minor positive progress.

Approximately 30 pages in the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission Report are reporting on Hong Kong, a few key points are highlighted below:

1. Pro-Beijing parties enjoyed a financial advantage over their rivals, which enabled them to build extensive logistical networks to mobilize voters and exploit Hong Kong’s electoral peculiarities. (p.267)

2. Babies born in the territory enjoy the privileges of Hong Kong citizenship: access to the city’s superior health and education systems, and greater freedom to travel and settle inside and outside China.(p.267)

3. So-called ‘‘birth-tourism’’ quickly became a hot-button issue, with some going so far as to depict mainland Chinese as ‘‘locusts.’(p.268)

4. Censorship controversies at the South China Morning Post, one of Hong Kong’s most prominent newspapers, increased following the appointment of Wang Xingwei as editor-in-chief in January 2012. Mr. Wang, a former China Daily reporter, concurrently serves as a member of Jilin Province’s Political Consultative Conference, 424 a Chinese Communist Party-selected and -controlled organization. In June, he was accused of censoring coverage of the death of Li Wangyang, a well-known Chinese dissident. (p.270)

5. The city’s public schools were going to be required to begin teach- ing a course in ‘‘moral and national education’’ by 2015, which some called a thinly veiled ‘‘brainwashing’’ effort evocative of the Cultural Revolution.(p.272)

6. Beijing’s increasing influence in Hong Kong’s affairs calls into question the security of advanced technology products exported from the United States to Hong Kong.(p.273)

7. Congress reauthorize Section 301 of the U.S.-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992, which requires the U.S. secretary of State to submit an annual report to Congress on political, economic, and social developments in Hong Kong of relevance to the United States. This should include reporting on mainland interference in Hong Kong’s internal political affairs and Chinese efforts to leverage the territory as a platform for the internationalization of the RMB.(p.274)

8. Congress review the U.S.-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992 to deter- mine its continued applicability. In particular, Congress should review the security of advanced technology products exported from the United States to Hong Kong.(p.274)

9. Members of Congress, when visiting mainland China, also visit Hong Kong and that Congress encourage senior administration officials, including the secretary of State, to make visits to Hong Kong part of their travel.(p.274)

Glad to know that the US is monitoring Hong Kong closely, and I hope the US will actually react and stop the PRC from further interfering Hong Kong’s autonomy, and gradually Hong Kong can go independent!