Hong Kongers Vote to Return to a British Overseas Territory

In light of the Falkland Islands’ referendum result, South China Morning Post, a local English language newspaper, posted a poll on its website on 12th March 2013 around 13.00, asking the Hong Kongers whether they’d vote to return to a British overseas territory, given the option. The number is similar to the Falkland Islanders’ – an overwhelmingly “YES” – 90% as of 15.31 on 13th March 2013 (just over 24 hours).Image

 

This poll isn’t the most sophisticated, nor is it well thought out given the fact that “independence” is not one of the options. It is, however, a clear evidence of the discontentment fellow Hong Kongers have due to the continuous and increasingly aggressive interference of the PRC China government, which is a clear breach of 1-Country-2-System policy and the Sino-British Join Declaration.

There are people and groups on Facebook and other social media saying that if given the option, at least over 50% of the Hong Kongers would vote for independence.

This is not just an alarming sign to the Hong Kong SAR and PRC governments, but also a signal of the upraise of self identity and political awareness of Hong Kongers.

Will Hong Kongers finally stand up against a totalitarian and the unjust being done back in the 80s when the Brits and the Chinese decided Hong Kongers’ faith and future without asking their consent?

There are discussions and intense debates about the “Occupy Central” notion first raised by a law faculty professor. His proposal is rather interesting: basically people have to turn themselves in before action by signing a “declaration”. Not that violence is encouraged by those who opposed this “proposal” but many criticise whether surrendering and notifying the authorities about this “non-corporation” movement.

HK reporter got beaten up in Peking

Breaking news!!!

A female HK reporter currently working on an assignment about Why Yang (also translated as “Yang Kuang”), a HK activist who went to the building block where Liu Xia lives (wife of Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu XiaoBo who’s been under house arrest for over 2 years with no legitimate reason) was surrounded and beaten up by at least 5 police in China.

Queen’s Road East – 90’s Canto-Pop

Queen’s Road East is a Canto-pop written in 1991, when Hong Kong’s future was determined by the British government and PRC government where Hong Kong people had absolutely no say. This song reflects the confusion of Hong Kongers and our fear for the Communist and PRC. If you watch the MTV carefully, you’d notice there are scenes of people and cars moving backward, a metaphor to symbolism that Hong Kong will go backward after the handover of sovereignty.

The lyrics is full of metaphor. Strongly illustrating Hong Kongers desperation and helplessness about our future.

Hope you’d enjoy the MTV and the lyrics translated below:

Queen’s Road West and Queen’s Road East
Queen’s Road East turns into Queen’s Road Central
Queen’s Road Central is crowded with people

Our royal friend is on the back of coins
Forever young and named the Queen
Follows me everywhere to do all sorts of trade
With an expressionless face that represents success

A dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
Where properties are available everywhere, people carry on buying and selling
But Mong Kok* may have to change its name

This rightful friend is familiar and friendly
Hence, allowing horses to race only twice a week
People, therefore, naturally compete to cross the finishing line
If you wish to be a citizens of the great nation, all it requires is money

Our dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
The hot and cold weather still affects this city
But we may have to seek help from people with supernatural power for a change of weather

Emptiness is form, form is emptiness**
Emptiness is form, form is emptiness…

This beautiful friend says goodbye in class
The same picture shown on TV every night
When the day of celebration comes, everyone has to applause
The respectable face on the back of coins turns into statues of martyrs

Our dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
The railways, buses and taxis will run all the same
But one may not know the routes anymore

* Mong Kok is a famous district with lots of hawker stalls, but have changed massively because of the influx of PRC Chinese tourists

** A famous Buddhist quote

Leaders of the PRC (China)

Pro-democracy, pro-HK-Independence and anti-CCP Facebook groups have been circulating an image in recent days – direct quotes from Premier Wen JiaBao’s government work report. Below is a translation of the caption:

43 Rounds of Applause 5 Years Ago…

“(We can) definitely guarantee the basic stability of market supply and market price”

“Make our motherland’s mountains greener, water clearer, sky more blue”

“We must ensure that our people’s minds are at easy when they eat and use (products), and make our export products to enjoy good reputation”

“(We will allow) everyone to enjoy basic health care services”

“We must be determined to push forward (our) real estate reform and development, making people and the public to live in peace and enjoy one’s work (note: a Chinese saying which means a stable and secured life with a roof above one’s head)”

“Only through distributing the fruits of economic development to the public, the harmony and stability of a society can be improved”

Five years have passed, NONE of the above was achieved.

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HK Primary School Material: Cannot Call Onself Hong Konger – HK Newspaper

After the massive anti National & Moral Education Curriculum that forced the Hong Kong SAR government to “shelved” the curriculum, Ming Pao reveals on 3rd March 2013 that Hong Kong schools are brain washing primary school kids via different text books.

Summary of the article below:

Although the National & Moral Education is not a standalone subject in Hong Kong anymore after the months long protest led by Scholarism (formulated by school children), a lot of content about “identifying one’s recognition of China” is penetrating various subject in primary school subjects, including Chinese language, general studies and Mandarin.

Parents’ Concerns Group reviewed the top three most popular sets of primary school text books in Hong Kong and found that some materials deliberately emphasis the “expression of emotions”. A chapter called “Metaphor of Motherland”, one of the primary 5 Chinese language chapters, included a “patriotic poem”. The teacher handbook of this chapter says that teachers should instruct students to “use sonorous tone to slowly read the poem aloud, when reading out the character ‘country’, the final note of of the character should be lengthen (note: in Cantonese, as well as other Chinese languages, this means a strong emphasis of a term/word) in order to show one’s admiration and respect to the country (i.e. China)”. Another chapter described China’s national flag as something “that will listen attentively (to students)”.

In a General Studies textbook for primary 1 to 5 students, when it described the established of People’s Republic of China (PRC), it only sketchily mentioned Mao Zidong, the Chairman of China’s Communist Party found the PRC which became strong after many years. It omitted all the tragedies happened in between, including the Cultural Revolution and 4th June incident (also known as “Tiananmen Square massacre”).

In a primary 2 English General Studies textbook, when it explains nationality, the teacher handbook listed clearly that students should NOT called themselves “Hong Kong People” (i.e. Hong Kongers/Hong Kongese): “Many children call themselves HK people but this is not a correct concept. One should say “I am a Chinese citizen living in HK (direct quote from the handbook)“. Concern Group questioned that the teacher handbook clearly pointed out that “HK people” is a politically incorrect concept, and deny the identify of Hong Konger.

The chairman of a teachers group focuses on Liberal Studies in HK said that the evaluation forms of many study tours that go to China (PRC) focus on how students’ perception of China (PRC) change after the tours, but do not cover students’ genuine impressions.

Chinese Call for Referendum

This is a recent post by Mainland Chinese in response to the new measures imposed by Hong Kong SAR government to tackle the formula powder shortage.

HK Government QNMLGB (please see note 1)!

Starting today, Mainlanders call for a referendum:

  1. China to limit electricity supply to Kong Kong – each Hong Konger will be allocated 2 units per day
  2. China to limit fresh water supply to Hong Kong – each Hong Konger will be allocated 2 liters per day

If any one to be found out using more than the above quota will be sentence for life and subject to lifetime deprivation of political rights (please see note 2).

Hong Kong Government: QNMLGB!!!

 

Reply to this post by another Chinese:

Have you no idea about how much of your (Hong Kong’s) resources is from China? Garbage running dogs dare to bite their owners (i.e. China)?

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Note 1: Chinese (mainland Chinese) very often use English letters to represent and abbreviate swear words as they’re think using them on blog and websites could make them look less civilised. QNMLGB is a “coded swear word”, which means “f**k your mothers smelly c**t”

Note 2: deprivation of political rights is a typical “punishment” in China, very often activities of human rights campaigns that are found guilty will be given this “punishment”

1st Jan 2013 – Major protest in Hong Kong

This protest was first talked about by a bunch of netizens who detest China Government’s illegal (according to Basic Law and Sino-British Joint Declaration) influence in Hong Kong. These people started talking about a protest on the new year’s day back in around November 2012.

Unfortunately, various political parties heard about this protest and started taking credit for this by claiming that they initiated it. Those who are truly independent and initiated it were not happy about it but if these politicians and organisations genuinely want to make Hong Kong a better place and share the same view (Mr. CY Leung, the Chief Executive of HKSAR to step down, universal suffrage, and a referendum on people’s constitutions), there is nothing to worry about.

The truth is, demonstration has long been dominated by a handful of political organisations. Every march in Hong Kong follows the same routine: gather at Victoria Park (the largest public park on Hong Kong Island, which is close to the heart of the government HQ) , then walk along the main roads which will be blockaded by the police ahead of time, within a certain period of time people in the rally have to arrive at a designated protest zone -> the “organiser” announces that the demonstration is a success (yet what’s been achieved is always the question) and urges protesters to go home…

This is exactly why nothing ever results from the numerous protests in Hong Kong in the past 15 years – Hong Kong is a colony of the People’s Republic of China, which is communist, perhaps more preciously, dictatorship. No dictator would ever listen to its people unless riots and violent demonstration kicks off.

“If you make peaceful revolution impossible you make violent revolution inevitable” – J.F. Kennedy

Somehow, people in Hong Kong are always very proud of themselves for being “peaceful, rational, and non-violent” during demonstration. They condemn the slightest anomaly (e.g. shouting at the police so that they will allow people to continue to rally) in a rally.

The “protest” in the 1st January 2013 march were once again hijacked by a political organisation. It seems like no body dares to walk on the street without a couple of “leaders”. Unfortunately, given their standard formula of demonstration, it was a complete failure, once again. Nothing’s achieved, nothings changed.

This year, a very very different form of protest happened. Around a dozen or twenty people who were wearing Guy Fawkes masks marched down to the cross road in the middle of Central, the centre of the Hong Kong Island and the financial and business centre of the city-state.

They sit down in the middle of the cross-road on a public holiday during non peak hour, blockading two main roads to make a clear statement to Hong Kong people, SAR government and international media that they are no longer content with what’s happening to their home.

This is the reason I detailed the “standard way” of Hong Kong style demonstration earlier. This group of Vs (V for Vendetta) is not from any sort of organisation, and they have one thing in common – passionate about Hong Kong, their home. Here’s an impromptu statement given by one of them who holds a handheld amplifier gave on the spot. In short, he was raising the questions about why Hong Kong people are tolerating the SAR government’s incompetence.

Very soon, people who were walking on the street started shouting at the masked protesters:

“You have the right to protest, but you should protest outside the government headquarters!”
“It’s wrong to cause inconvenience to people who aren’t in the protest! If you want CY Leung to step down, go to the Government House and tell him!””You people have nothing better to do! A bunch of losers!”
“You are blockading the road making your point, and I can’t go home!”

I was watching all these and feeling heart broken – why are these people so blind? There is no violence involved in this demonstration, and yet people do not appreciate what some of them put their liberty and safety behind to fight for them? (One of them got arrested at the end)

There were some, however, who read about the masked protesters online (Facebook, online media, etc), and went down to support.

The masked protesters were soon surrounded by police – no more than 20 masked protesters and over 200 hundred police officers. The protesters were about to retreat and head for another spot, and one of them who was further away from the rest was tackled by at least one police officer like in a rugby game, and fall over.

Soon, other organised groups went to the same location. They had no choice because the police were blockading all the routes to the Government House, and all these routes were agreed by the police when the organisers applied for the demonstration. The police blockaded all the roads, which major traffic go by 24 hours, and soon one of the representatives of the police force went on TV and condemned the protesters for disrupting the peace. Kwok-Hung Leung (nickname: Long Hair), one of the Legislative Council members participated in numerous demonstrations, was surrounded by over 300 hundred police in the middle of the road on his own, and was later on charged for illegal assembly.

In different parts of Central, some of the protesters were trapped between police cordons, and one senior officer (recorded on tape) shouted at the protesters that “do not let them leave” and ordered his subordinates to surround the protesters.

VJMedia, an independent online media (relatively new), published a very detail and probably the most unbiased article illustrating the details of what exactly happened during the march. I’m not translating it here, but if i receive any request (even one!) I’ll translate it for the English readers.

Please leave your comments.