Hong Kong Universal Suffrage

As stated in Hong Kong Basic Law, Hong Kong’s mini-constitution, by 2007 Hong Kong people have the rights to elect their own leader, i.e. the Chief Executive. In 2004, the National People’s Congress of Communist China interpreted Basic Law to deny such rights, and in 2007 the NPC once again denied the universal suffrage of Chief Executive of Hong Kong. This constitute a breach of contract (i.e. Sino-British Joint Declaration). Nothing has changed so far. The “political reform” proposed by the Hong Kong SAR government clearly shown that PRC has not intention to demolish functional constituency (members of this constituency are not elected by all the people of Hong Kong, but a small group of so-called elites). The Democratic Party engaged in a closed door negotiation with the Liaison Office of the Central People’s Government and voted for this proposal which essentially represents a decline of democracy in Hong Kong.

With the background above, the people of Hong Kong are increasingly displeased with China’s continuous interference of Hong Kongers’ rights and the hindrance of Hong Kongers’ demand for a democratic society.

In January 2013, Benny Yiu Ting Tai, an associate professor at The University of Hong Kong, announced his “Occupy Central” proposal. The proposal (as it develops over time) includes 7 steps: 10,000 participants signing declaration (taking a vow and pledge that they’re willing to take it to the street), live TV broadcast of discussion, electronic voting on formula (of universal suffrage), referendum on formula, Super-Seat Legislative Council member resign and trigger another referendum, legal and affect-no-social-order movement, occupy Central in July 2014.

The notion Occupy Central received a lot of attention, and supports of the public when it was first announced (without any of the above steps). However, as Professor Tai’s theory develops, debates arise – will this actually work?

Hong Kong has been fighting for universal suffrage of its own Chief Executive for a long time. The bottom line for any democratic election is that candidates running for the leader of a society election will not be sift from a number of candidates by any sort of committee and finally be elected by the people – 1 person 1 vote. All Legislative Council members are elected by the people, again 1 person 1 vote.

The pro-Peking (PRC) individuals jumped out to defend China’s position recently as the debate heats up. There are reports and rumours saying that there will be a “pre-election” before the universal suffrage in 2017, meaning a selection of candidates will be elected by a committee controlled by the PRC. The PRC government officials also said that “the CE must love China and love Hong Kong”, putting China in front of Hong Kong, the place the CE will govern, and setting “love China” as a criteria is simply not acceptable nor necessary. The same official also said that “PRC will not accept a CE that is not patriotic” – this means that Hong Kong people ruling Hong Kong is only a myth. Not to mention the fact that PRC as a nation is hijacked by the China Communist Party, if one is not loyal to the Party means that he/she is not patriotic.

Regina Ip (former Security Secretary in Hong Kong who pushed for Article 23) even said “pre-election” exists in any democratic society. This is complete rubbish – the so-called “pre-election” in democratic societies are elections each political party hold to choose the representative from the party to run for office.

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HK Primary School Material: Cannot Call Onself Hong Konger – HK Newspaper

After the massive anti National & Moral Education Curriculum that forced the Hong Kong SAR government to “shelved” the curriculum, Ming Pao reveals on 3rd March 2013 that Hong Kong schools are brain washing primary school kids via different text books.

Summary of the article below:

Although the National & Moral Education is not a standalone subject in Hong Kong anymore after the months long protest led by Scholarism (formulated by school children), a lot of content about “identifying one’s recognition of China” is penetrating various subject in primary school subjects, including Chinese language, general studies and Mandarin.

Parents’ Concerns Group reviewed the top three most popular sets of primary school text books in Hong Kong and found that some materials deliberately emphasis the “expression of emotions”. A chapter called “Metaphor of Motherland”, one of the primary 5 Chinese language chapters, included a “patriotic poem”. The teacher handbook of this chapter says that teachers should instruct students to “use sonorous tone to slowly read the poem aloud, when reading out the character ‘country’, the final note of of the character should be lengthen (note: in Cantonese, as well as other Chinese languages, this means a strong emphasis of a term/word) in order to show one’s admiration and respect to the country (i.e. China)”. Another chapter described China’s national flag as something “that will listen attentively (to students)”.

In a General Studies textbook for primary 1 to 5 students, when it described the established of People’s Republic of China (PRC), it only sketchily mentioned Mao Zidong, the Chairman of China’s Communist Party found the PRC which became strong after many years. It omitted all the tragedies happened in between, including the Cultural Revolution and 4th June incident (also known as “Tiananmen Square massacre”).

In a primary 2 English General Studies textbook, when it explains nationality, the teacher handbook listed clearly that students should NOT called themselves “Hong Kong People” (i.e. Hong Kongers/Hong Kongese): “Many children call themselves HK people but this is not a correct concept. One should say “I am a Chinese citizen living in HK (direct quote from the handbook)“. Concern Group questioned that the teacher handbook clearly pointed out that “HK people” is a politically incorrect concept, and deny the identify of Hong Konger.

The chairman of a teachers group focuses on Liberal Studies in HK said that the evaluation forms of many study tours that go to China (PRC) focus on how students’ perception of China (PRC) change after the tours, but do not cover students’ genuine impressions.

Bauhinia – an old song about Hong Kong. My motherland, my home, today and forever.

This old song is called “Bauhinia”, written by Sam Hui in the 80s – He’s a legendary singer-song-writer in Hong Kong. He’s written a number of extremely beautiful songs reflecting the real life of Hong Kong people. This is one of my favourites.

The video shows the amazing transformation of Hong Kong, a clip for a video competition made by Hong Kong people.

Here’s my attempt to translate the lyrics, hope you enjoy the video and the music:

Bauhinia by Sam Hui

Neon lights, shopping paradise. A free and prosperous city
A fishing island, weathered all sizes of storms. A tiny spot on earth that enjoys fame
In the East, a pearl shines
Foreigners are attracted to it, the one-and-only Hong Kong
In Hong Kong, the home of you and I – Hong Kong
Bauhinias blossom everywhere, eyeful of enchanting scenery

For Hong Kong’s future, we must have hope, find solutions together, to ensure its forever stability
Ahead of us is a broad road. Nothing for us to fear for. We have each other to weather any storms

In the East, a pearl shines
Continue to strive for Hong Kong’s future
Never stop developing, so it will shine even brighter.
Help each other, face challenges together
Ensure the forever blossom of our Bauhinia. Remain strong, Hong Kong!

Hong Kong will continue to be a paradise, because there’s always light at the end of the tunnel

洋紫荊 許冠傑

霓虹橙光,購物天堂,自由都市,百業繁旺,
捕魚小島,遍歷風浪,在地球一小角,卻負名望。
在東方,有粒珍珠閃閃發光,
外地人都嚮往要看看,這獨特社會香港,

在香港,你我的家鄉香港,
艷麗洋紫荊到處盛放,滿眼盡是好風光。
為未來香港,抱著希望,共謀方法,使它永安,
路仍康莊,那有驚惶,望齊心一致,再破萬重浪。

在東方,有粒珍珠閃閃發光,為未來香港再努力幹,
不斷地發展使它更光,互相幫,困境風浪一起去擋,
讓洋紫荊永遠盛放,永遠是原狀,香港!

願明天香港也是天堂,定能看得見一點曙光。