Chinese and China – Experts in Moving the Goal Posts

Here’s an article in today’s Bloomberg News:

China Rejects Open Nomination for Election of Hong Kong Leader

The Hong Kong public can’t nominate candidates for the next chief executive election under the city’s de facto constitution, China’s top official in the former British colony said, rejecting a lawmaker’s proposal.

The city’s Basic Law states that candidates for the chief executive position have to be nominated by a “broadly representative” committee, Zhang Xiaoming, director of China’s Liaison Office in Hong Kong, said in an open letter to Alan Leong, the head of the Civic Party.

 

Flags of China & Hong Kong

A Chinese national flag, left, and a Hong Kong SAR flag fly outside the Legislative Council Complex in Hong Kong. Photographer: Jerome Favre/Bloomberg

Zhang’s comments are the clearest China has made in rejecting demands from Hong Kong opposition lawmakers to allow for democracy in line with international standards in 2017, when it has pledged to allow election of the city’s leader. Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying, who was picked by a committee of billionaires, professionals and lawmakers, is facing rising calls to start consultation on arranging the vote.

“The proper way forward is to follow the Basic Law and the National People’s Congress Standing Committee’s procedures, rather than straying from the law and going the wrong way,” Zhang said in the statement published on the office’s website, as he rejected Leong’s invitation to discuss the proposal at a seminar.

Leung said in an interview in June he wants to deliver on the electoral reforms, though increased democracy may lead to China’s refusal to appoint a leader elected by the city’s people. Allowing for a full exercise in democracy in Hong Kong will also contrast with the political system in China, which has been ruled by the Communist Party since 1949.

Pro-democracy groups in Hong Kong have suggested options including opening the nomination to candidates who receive support from at least 2 percent of registered voters.

China’s “One Country, Two Systems” policy granted Hong Kong its own legal system under the Basic Law for 50 years from 1997. The city allows residents civil liberties including a free press and freedom of assembly not permitted in the mainland.

Basically what China’s said was “Anything that is not stated in the Basic Law is not allowed” – Hang on a minute, Basic Law is a constitution for Hong Kong but it was NOT drafted by the people of Hong Kong and we as Hong Kongers have NO right to interpret or amend it but China has. Mind you, Chinese are the experts in moving the goal posts, so no matter what you do or say, they’ll find a way to “win the argument”.

Now, the Basic Law didn’t say anything about people of Hong Kong are allowed to breath, eat, drink, etc. We’re all breaching the law! Hurrah!

What a whole load of rubbish. By the time they’ve completed their colonisation scheme (with substantial amount of new immigrants in HK who are all CCP members/brainwashed to trust nobody but the party), of course China will have no problem about “giving” Hong Kong democracy and universal suffrage, they’ve got a lot of Chinese voting the way China wants it!

Democracy is never given, it’s something that people fight for.

BTW, if one day, Article 23 is passed, this blog will be gone and so would I…

Over and out!

Communist Chinese Rule Hong Kong

1st March 2013, Friday

Communist Youth League of China’s Plan to Rule HK – Ethnic Cleansing

We often hear that the ultimate targets for Mainland Chinese students are the US and the UK and Hong Kong is only a stepping stone. This is correct, but is only the partial fact.

The top trench of Chinese students, of course, leaves China. Those who have strong family background (i.e. parents being senior government officials) will return to China so to become the new officials. The truth is, 80 million of China’s 1.3 billion populations are Communist Party members, and the second generation of the low to middle ranking government officials wants to get “benefits” too.

It is not very difficult for Chinese to study abroad, and it is not especially hard for them to find a job in the West either. However, the high tax rate and mediocre salary in the West, plus their level of English isn’t universally high and the most difficult part of all is to integrate into the western society. This conclusion is based on the observation that Chinese students in Hong Kong failed to integrate into Hong Kong, and those in the rest of the world tend to gather in their local China Towns. It shows that the number of Chinese students who can integrate into the western world is limited. Given the number of Chinese students in other countries, the number of those who make it is still substantial.

Where in the world is easy to immigrate, with low income tax rate and a government that favours Chinese? The answer is Hong Kong! Chinese who study in the UK cannot apply for neutralisation unless they have been living in the UK for ten years. But in Hong Kong, all it takes is to study a MA, a one year programme, and apply for work visa and they can immediately become Hong Kong residents. This is the same as hospital selling labour ward space to Chinese and give a Hong Kong ID card to the new born for free: universities sell their degrees and attach a “free” Hong Kong ID card. As the number of highly-educated people that work in hospitals is very limited compare to those who teach at universities, every time when people raise questions about the university selling degree to Chinese, people jump out to defend this system and glorify it as a measure to “resolve the aging population in Hong Kong” and to “introduce top quality professionals to Hong Kong”.

China’s ethnic cleansing plan on Hong Kong started way back. In recent years, you can see a lot of young men and women, the children of senior, middle and low ranking government officials in China, in Hong Kong. These people came to Hong Kong to study, and obtain their Hong Kong ID and take the Hong Kong government funded scholarships to study their Masters in Ivy League, Cambridge and Oxford. They then returned to Hong Kong as professionals, for example, barristers, solicitors and iBankers, and live in luxurious places. Those who are not professionals, take a linguistic degree, study in translation, work in the cultural and arts space, or even become columnists. Why would they take up any opportunities in Hong Kong? The answer is simple: Hong Kong is way better than the hell China. A Hong Kong ID card is almost like insurance to them – for example, Lai ChangXing and Gu KaiLai both hold Hong Kong ID cards.

The HKSAR Government Scholarship Fund is a reward for the Communist Youth League of China. You don’t believe it? Let me explain to you. A few years ago, CEPA secretly introduced a scheme that is tailored for Mainland Chinese, allowing them to convert their licences to Hong Kong driving licenses for free. In less than six years, a total over 85,000 Hong Kong driving licenses were issued to Mainland Chinese (there are only 400,000 private cars in Hong Kong, there is no need to issue so many driving licenses) [my note: HK’s road system and traffic regulations are very different from those in China]. According to BBC’s report in February 2012, a record of over 13,000 Hong Kong driving license holders attempted to convert into the UK driving license in two years. A tiny Hong Kong bet the rest of the world in this incident. Years ago, we have predicted that this new measure is for Mainland Chinese to con the world. People didn’t believe in us, and eventually the UK government amended its law this January to close the loophole which seems to be targeting Hong Kong: “to convert to UK driving license applicants must passed the driving test at the issued destination” – which means Hong Kong license issued to individuals who took the driving test in Hong Kong, but not Hong Kong license converted from a China license, can be converted into UK license – A tailor made measure targeting Mainland Chinese students.

In time, the Communist Youth League of China and offspring of low to middle ranking China government officials will come to Hong Kong to study (for example, international school), then endorsed by the HKSAR government to study abroad, and return to Hong Kong as Hong Kong permanent residence to teach National and Moral Education for a couple years. They will also at the same time, participate in arts competitions, join advisory organization, HKSAR’s Central Policy Unit, and all of a sudden become part of the HKSAR government, and in a few years the leaders of Hong Kong to rule Hong Kong.

These have been happening for at least eight to ten years. Many genuine Hong Kongers still dream about “establishing a free China”, and fail to realize that China has already successfully planted the seeds of and executing “the great plan of Communists ruling Hong Kong”!

Kay Lam, a local Hong Kong columnist