Chinese Condemn Man U. HK Supporters for Not Saying They’re from “Hong Kong, China”

As Sir Ferguson led the Manchester United football team the very last time at Old Trafford Stadium, a couple of Hong Kong supporters flew all the way to show their gratitude to their hero, a legendary manager.

I’d imagine that if an Irish man was in the same situation, he would signed off as “from Ireland”, and Scottish fellow would very likely to sign it off as “from Scotland”.

However, after this photo was published online, “complaints” started flooding to the forums, condemning this Man. U. fan for not writing “Hong Kong, China” in his handmade signage.

Hong Kong netizens, of course, immediately felt the comments made by Chinese (from China) offensive – after all, during the time when the Brits ruled Hong Kong, and their appearance (DNA, blood, whatever) is very different from Hong Kongers, they have never demanded Hong Kongers to call themselves British Hong Konger, nor would they required us to say we are from “Hong Kong, British Colony”.

A little fact to show Hong Kong is separated from China: when someone wants to dial a Hong Kong number from elsewhere in the world, the country code is +852 as oppose to China’s +86.

This is not the first time Chinese from China are upset about Hong Kongers refusing to say they are from China or refused to call themselves Chinese. Badcanto, a friendly blogger, wrote a lot about this kind of “conflicts”.

For some reason, Chinese always say Hong Kongers are Chinese when they need help from Hong Kongers (e.g. after the Sichuan earthquakes, which HK government donated billions of dollars in different occasions despite the majority of the public is against the donation as people of Hong Kong cannot trust any funding could reach the victims but the corrupt officials, they would use the “excuse” of “blood is thicker than water” – isn’t this used to described real blood relatives? Since when this applies to a nationality, which is something that everyone can choose?).

However, when Hong Kong people tell Chinese off for their uncivilised behaviours (e.g. answering nature’s call in the public, not queuing, being rude, spitting, littering, smuggling formula powder, etc) or say that CCP is evil, Chinese would go crazy and tell Hong Kongers to leave Hong Kong as Hong Kong is China’s land and Hong Kongers should not continue to live in Hong Kong (our home!) if we do not like China!

One of the “argument” when they come across Hong Kongers saying they’re not Chinese or Hong Kongers pointing out that Chinese are rude/impolite/not civilised (many incidents we witness day in day out), they would simply reply “with black hair and yellow skin, you are Chinese too! So you don’t have the right to tell your ‘fellow Chinese’ off.”

Not everyone with black hair and yellow skin is not Chinese – last time I check Japanese and Korean are with black hair and yellow(-ish) skin (as opposed to Caucasians) too! Some extremist in China would say “of course Japanese and Korean are Chinese! Their ancestors went to Japan and Korea back in the old days.” Isn’t this hilarious? I have yet to meet any English who would say Americans and Australians are all English. At the same time, many American who were originally from other countries would not call themselves Italian, English, African or anything if their families have been there for long enough.

By the way, Tibetans don’t look like Chinese based on the skin and hair colour standard, but why is Tibet part of China? This can go on! I came across this article, which explains a bit of how this kind of mind set is formed.

Chip Tsao, a famous columnist and radio talk-show host, once said that Chinese as well as the government in China are experts at “moving the goal posts” – that means the rule are set by them but they can move it around whichever way they want to ensure that they would always win the game. I can’t agree more on this front – Chinese and especially the officials are indeed experts in bending the rules the way that favour them!

Saw the below example recently, and reminded me about Mr. Tsao’s comment above:

At a Foreign Ministry’s press conference, a journalist asked the ministry’s spokesperson Hua Chunying why China has to implement the “online real name system”.

Hua said, “everyone needs to be responsible for what they say. Some people use the internet to spread rumours, so the ‘real name system’ must be implemented.”

Journalist followed up, “Is every one responsible for their behaviours then? If so, why hasn’t anyone taken the responsibility of the Jerry-built buildings in Sichuan which killed a lot of children?

Hua replied, “this is a different matter!”

ANGRY! 70% of Students in HK’s Universities are Mainland Chinese!!!

I do not suppose anyone would disagree that universities in Hong Kong should give priority to Hong Kong students.

In Hong Kong, the number of students from China has been growing while the number of spaces for the local Hong Kong students has been stagnant. Bear in mind the fact that these universities are partly funded by the Hong Kong SAR government, which means tax payers in Hong Kong are funding foreign students.

The latest statistics show that an alarming 70% of the postgraduate students in the universities in Hong Kong are Chinese from Mainland China. These universities explain that recruiting foreign students is a way to internationalise their schools. However, the so called “internationalisation” is misleading! A truly internationlised university should have students from all over the world, which is what universities in Hong Kong used to be, but not from ONE SINGLE COUNTRY.

The majority of these so called “international” students from China have the traditionally Chinese mentality – refuse to emigrate into the local society nor would they embrace the local culture, criticise Hong Kong and the people of Hong Kong, victimise themselves when they provoke public outcry. Here are a few blog posts by another blogger about these students from China:

City University incident

Student from China Calls HKer DOGS

Poly U China Students Hates HK

One thing I want to say is if these students from China despise their host universities and their host country (Hong Kong) and if China is such a wonderful place in all aspects, why did they CHOOSE to come to Hong Kong to study? Why did they CHOOSE to work in Hong Kong after they graduated? All they want is the Hong Kong identity cards or use Hong Kong as a platform for them to immigrate to other countries!

Hong Kong students are working on raising fund to place advertisements in newspapers. Below are the first round of designs, you can also visit the Facebook group which was set up a while ago:

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There have been numerous cases that clearly shows these universities favours students from China. The banners they put up in the campuses are in Simplified Chinese instead of the official written language – Traditional Chinese. Announcements are written with China terminologies. There’s a case recently reported by the press which was extremely controversial (also shows how ungrateful those Chinese students could be, CY Leung helped him to get his degree, and he turned around and said CY Leung would unlikely to uphold justice during his tenure as Hong Kong SAR’s Chief Executive).

Another thought: The world is getting really confused about how to differentiate between Hong Kongers and Chinese, sometimes they mixed Taiwanese up with Chinese as well! I can honestly say, this would insult the genuine Taiwanese and Hong Kongers who have their national pride.

Hong Kongers Vote to Return to a British Overseas Territory

In light of the Falkland Islands’ referendum result, South China Morning Post, a local English language newspaper, posted a poll on its website on 12th March 2013 around 13.00, asking the Hong Kongers whether they’d vote to return to a British overseas territory, given the option. The number is similar to the Falkland Islanders’ – an overwhelmingly “YES” – 90% as of 15.31 on 13th March 2013 (just over 24 hours).Image

 

This poll isn’t the most sophisticated, nor is it well thought out given the fact that “independence” is not one of the options. It is, however, a clear evidence of the discontentment fellow Hong Kongers have due to the continuous and increasingly aggressive interference of the PRC China government, which is a clear breach of 1-Country-2-System policy and the Sino-British Join Declaration.

There are people and groups on Facebook and other social media saying that if given the option, at least over 50% of the Hong Kongers would vote for independence.

This is not just an alarming sign to the Hong Kong SAR and PRC governments, but also a signal of the upraise of self identity and political awareness of Hong Kongers.

Will Hong Kongers finally stand up against a totalitarian and the unjust being done back in the 80s when the Brits and the Chinese decided Hong Kongers’ faith and future without asking their consent?

There are discussions and intense debates about the “Occupy Central” notion first raised by a law faculty professor. His proposal is rather interesting: basically people have to turn themselves in before action by signing a “declaration”. Not that violence is encouraged by those who opposed this “proposal” but many criticise whether surrendering and notifying the authorities about this “non-corporation” movement.

National Education Centre Asks Schools for Endorsement

Following on my previous post about National and Moral Education Curriculum, despite the fact that the Curriculum is quietly embedded in various subjects, the National Education Centre continues to work on establishing a new subject for students in Hong Kong in order to further brainwash children.

SupportNationalEducationAbove picture obtained from House News, for original article in Cantonese/Chinese, please refer to here.

The National Education Centre issued letters to all schools in Hong Kong, which provides a simple letter that says:

Dear Sir/Madam,

Since the National Education Centre always strives to promote national education and national quality education, I am happy to support the Centre to continue servicing the education sector and its continuous operation.

Best regards,

____________

Cheung Yui-Fai, a liberal studies teacher, posted the letter onto the Facebook page of National Education Parents’ Concern Group. As a committee member of the Hong Kong Professional Teachers’ Union, Cheung questioned the agenda behind the Centre’s letter – does this mean the biased National Education Curriculum is returning in full form (base on the “coincident” of the HKSAR government’s mentioned National Education in its Human Rights report which was submitted to the United Nation recently).

Cheung also added that the Centre has not done anything ever since the people won the “war” which forced the HKSAR government to “shelved” the curriculum.

On the second page of the letter issued by the Centre, a survey asked the schools if they have participate any of the activities organised by the Centre and what recommendations they have for the activities.

In the Human Rights report submitted to the United Nation, Chapter 2.21, says “This new initiative is expected to be implemented in the 2013/14 school year to further enhance the elements of national education”, and completely omitted the fact that the HKSAR government has announced the curriculum is shelved in September 2012.

HK reporter got beaten up in Peking

Breaking news!!!

A female HK reporter currently working on an assignment about Why Yang (also translated as “Yang Kuang”), a HK activist who went to the building block where Liu Xia lives (wife of Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu XiaoBo who’s been under house arrest for over 2 years with no legitimate reason) was surrounded and beaten up by at least 5 police in China.

Leaders of the PRC (China)

Pro-democracy, pro-HK-Independence and anti-CCP Facebook groups have been circulating an image in recent days – direct quotes from Premier Wen JiaBao’s government work report. Below is a translation of the caption:

43 Rounds of Applause 5 Years Ago…

“(We can) definitely guarantee the basic stability of market supply and market price”

“Make our motherland’s mountains greener, water clearer, sky more blue”

“We must ensure that our people’s minds are at easy when they eat and use (products), and make our export products to enjoy good reputation”

“(We will allow) everyone to enjoy basic health care services”

“We must be determined to push forward (our) real estate reform and development, making people and the public to live in peace and enjoy one’s work (note: a Chinese saying which means a stable and secured life with a roof above one’s head)”

“Only through distributing the fruits of economic development to the public, the harmony and stability of a society can be improved”

Five years have passed, NONE of the above was achieved.

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HK Primary School Material: Cannot Call Onself Hong Konger – HK Newspaper

After the massive anti National & Moral Education Curriculum that forced the Hong Kong SAR government to “shelved” the curriculum, Ming Pao reveals on 3rd March 2013 that Hong Kong schools are brain washing primary school kids via different text books.

Summary of the article below:

Although the National & Moral Education is not a standalone subject in Hong Kong anymore after the months long protest led by Scholarism (formulated by school children), a lot of content about “identifying one’s recognition of China” is penetrating various subject in primary school subjects, including Chinese language, general studies and Mandarin.

Parents’ Concerns Group reviewed the top three most popular sets of primary school text books in Hong Kong and found that some materials deliberately emphasis the “expression of emotions”. A chapter called “Metaphor of Motherland”, one of the primary 5 Chinese language chapters, included a “patriotic poem”. The teacher handbook of this chapter says that teachers should instruct students to “use sonorous tone to slowly read the poem aloud, when reading out the character ‘country’, the final note of of the character should be lengthen (note: in Cantonese, as well as other Chinese languages, this means a strong emphasis of a term/word) in order to show one’s admiration and respect to the country (i.e. China)”. Another chapter described China’s national flag as something “that will listen attentively (to students)”.

In a General Studies textbook for primary 1 to 5 students, when it described the established of People’s Republic of China (PRC), it only sketchily mentioned Mao Zidong, the Chairman of China’s Communist Party found the PRC which became strong after many years. It omitted all the tragedies happened in between, including the Cultural Revolution and 4th June incident (also known as “Tiananmen Square massacre”).

In a primary 2 English General Studies textbook, when it explains nationality, the teacher handbook listed clearly that students should NOT called themselves “Hong Kong People” (i.e. Hong Kongers/Hong Kongese): “Many children call themselves HK people but this is not a correct concept. One should say “I am a Chinese citizen living in HK (direct quote from the handbook)“. Concern Group questioned that the teacher handbook clearly pointed out that “HK people” is a politically incorrect concept, and deny the identify of Hong Konger.

The chairman of a teachers group focuses on Liberal Studies in HK said that the evaluation forms of many study tours that go to China (PRC) focus on how students’ perception of China (PRC) change after the tours, but do not cover students’ genuine impressions.