Follow up on Beijing Woman Slams Hong Kong Movie “Vulgaria”

Please refer to my last post Beijing Woman Slams Hong Kong Movie “Vulgaria” to get an understanding of this news.

After investigations, the netizens and media found out a bit more about this prize winner. Jia XuanNing wrote another “critic piece” on a China produced movie “Lost in Thailand (泰囧)” which was openly accused by the Thailand government for insulting Thai people. Ms. Jia praised this movie in her critic and said that “(the movie) brings popular fun to the pre-Lunar New Year dullness in China”. The movie itself, according to sources and Thai people, blatantly smears the Thai. Ms. Jia’s critic piece is available in Simplified Chinese here.

Columnists today, in response to this new “discovery”, wrote a fair few pieces (example 1 and 2). In short, they think that Ms. Jia is “double standard” and “is a typical China Communist party member – who defends China and Chinese blindly even though they are in the wrong”.

According to netizens, in a nut shell, the mentality of China Communists is: people outside of China (that is the rest of the world including Hong Kong) who portrait the negatives of Chinese and China are discriminating Chinese because they envy China’s wealth, but Chinese can do whatever they like (mocking other races, calling Caucasians names despite faking a smile in front of them, etc) and Chinese people would glorify their acts and use propaganda to influence (some call it “brainwash”) other Chinese people; and the outsiders (including Hong Kongers) is wrong about doing a certain thing, but it’s perfectly ok for Chinese to do the same thing.

In Ms. Jia’s critic piece on “Lost in Thailand” she said the complete opposite of what she wrote in the critic about the HK movie Vulgaria:

China produced comedy may create a new style of “Lunar New Year movie”, to demonstrate a stronger local character (of China) to the world.

In her critic on Vulgaria (the HK produced movie that targets HK locals), Ms. Jia said that the sarcasm of Chinese in Vulgaria is discriminating Chinese (Ms. Jia is accused to have selectively ignored the fact that the movie makes fun of local Hong Kongers most of the time).

A few columnists said that Ms. Jia is only a higher paid “50 cents” (she won HK$50,000 for what she wrote about Vulgaria). Newspapers also reported today that Ms. Jia is closely related to the judge panel of this prize, which is supported by the HKSAR government (that is tax payers are funding it). Some said that this is only a little step of China’s influence and propaganda to brainwash and “correct” Hong Kongers’ feelings against Chinese.

 

2012 Report to Congress U.S.-CHINA ECONOMIC AND SECURITY REVIEW COMMISSION

I bumped into a Cantonese blog yesterday, and think this is a minor positive progress.

Approximately 30 pages in the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission Report are reporting on Hong Kong, a few key points are highlighted below:

1. Pro-Beijing parties enjoyed a financial advantage over their rivals, which enabled them to build extensive logistical networks to mobilize voters and exploit Hong Kong’s electoral peculiarities. (p.267)

2. Babies born in the territory enjoy the privileges of Hong Kong citizenship: access to the city’s superior health and education systems, and greater freedom to travel and settle inside and outside China.(p.267)

3. So-called ‘‘birth-tourism’’ quickly became a hot-button issue, with some going so far as to depict mainland Chinese as ‘‘locusts.’(p.268)

4. Censorship controversies at the South China Morning Post, one of Hong Kong’s most prominent newspapers, increased following the appointment of Wang Xingwei as editor-in-chief in January 2012. Mr. Wang, a former China Daily reporter, concurrently serves as a member of Jilin Province’s Political Consultative Conference, 424 a Chinese Communist Party-selected and -controlled organization. In June, he was accused of censoring coverage of the death of Li Wangyang, a well-known Chinese dissident. (p.270)

5. The city’s public schools were going to be required to begin teach- ing a course in ‘‘moral and national education’’ by 2015, which some called a thinly veiled ‘‘brainwashing’’ effort evocative of the Cultural Revolution.(p.272)

6. Beijing’s increasing influence in Hong Kong’s affairs calls into question the security of advanced technology products exported from the United States to Hong Kong.(p.273)

7. Congress reauthorize Section 301 of the U.S.-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992, which requires the U.S. secretary of State to submit an annual report to Congress on political, economic, and social developments in Hong Kong of relevance to the United States. This should include reporting on mainland interference in Hong Kong’s internal political affairs and Chinese efforts to leverage the territory as a platform for the internationalization of the RMB.(p.274)

8. Congress review the U.S.-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992 to deter- mine its continued applicability. In particular, Congress should review the security of advanced technology products exported from the United States to Hong Kong.(p.274)

9. Members of Congress, when visiting mainland China, also visit Hong Kong and that Congress encourage senior administration officials, including the secretary of State, to make visits to Hong Kong part of their travel.(p.274)

Glad to know that the US is monitoring Hong Kong closely, and I hope the US will actually react and stop the PRC from further interfering Hong Kong’s autonomy, and gradually Hong Kong can go independent!

President Obama re-elected as President of the United States of America

Today is an important day to the Americans, as well as the world.

Congratulations to President Obama for winning the election. His speech got me, and possibly many Hong Kongers, thinking. Not just the humanity in his speech, but a certain line caught my eyes in particular:

…That’s why we do this. That’s what politics can be. That’s why elections matter. It’s not small, it’s big. It’s important. Democracy in a nation of 300 million can be noisy and messy and complicated. We have our own opinions. Each of us has deeply held beliefs. And when we go through tough times, when we make big decisions as a country, it necessarily stirs passions, stirs up controversy. That won’t change after tonight. And it shouldn’t. These arguments we have are a mark of our liberty, and we can never forget that as we speak, people in distant nations are risking their lives right now just for a chance to argue about the issues that matter – (cheers, applause) – the chance to cast their ballots like we did today.

Although I do not think that President Obama was referring to Hong Kong (very likely to be referring to the Middle East), it still touches me.

Hong Kong, a British colony for over a century and now a Chinese (as a country) colony (in nature). Americans are free to vote for the person who they believe will lead the country to a better future, yet Hong Kongers were never given (!!) such right. In any civialised country in the world, right to vote is almost granted. As a financial hub and an international place, Hong Kong people have never enjoyed this “privilege”.

There have been former PRC government officials commenting that there’s a “wave of Hong Kong independence” and it should be condemned. I have one question: why is asking for independence and democracy a crime?

Hong Kong may be too small to many of you in the world, but does that mean that people in Hong Kong do not deserve the right to elect its own government?

To go independent or not, should be determined by the people of the land. There is no doubt that Hong Kong needs a universal suffrage to elect its own government, there is no doubt that Hong Kongers have the right to vote for their future!

Whether or not we could survive as an independent country/state is one matter, but why people, often not Hong Kongers, always think and say that “it’s impossible so it should be not done”?

Once again, I congratulate President Obama and I wish him the best of luck! Four more years!

Hong Kong People Demand Referendum

Facebook has been the most important tool for many people movements and activists.

In a couple of months ago, over 120,000 Hong Kong people went on the street to protest against the Moral and National Education Curriculum. Hong Kong’s activities are using Facebook to call for actions and gather people who share the same or similar ideas.

Long See, is one of the famous ones on Facebook because of the pictures and graphics he/she produces on a regular (if not daily) basis. Today, Long See posted a new one:

Image

1-Country-2-System is Destroyed
Joint Declaration is Lapsed
High degree of autonomy is Gone
We Demand Independence Referendum in HK

Looks like there are more and more people becoming painful away of the fact that the PRC government’s master plan on colonising Hong Kong. There are numerous evidences that point to this conclusion.

Again, something that I want to write more about – things just emerge so quickly and so frequently that I find it hard to keep up with. Please bear with me, I’ll do my best…

Stay tune to more articles about why many think that Hong Kong is dying (not those who live outside of HK), why it should be saved and who (in my point of view) should be responsible for foreseeable death of HK hence must help to Free Hong Kong!