Billy, a Protester got Arrested but Released TWICE

Billy Chiu, an activist who’s participated in various rallies, was arrested on 4/Aug during a rally to support freedom of speech and against suppression imposed by the CCP and HKSAR government.

The reason? A police officer claimed that Billy tried to snatch his gun!

I wonder if the police did actually feel Billy’s hand touching his gun or was that all a bit of a made up story – because he was RELEASE unconditionally and the police simply said it was just a misunderstanding… What they accused Billy of doing was pretty serious crime, shouldn’t they have handled it more carefully – i.e. at least to have clear evidence? The police officer had his hand covering his gun… Exactly how was that possible? Also, was it really necessary to have eight policemen to move a skinny young lad?

Billy met his misfortune once again yesterday (18/Aug). This time round he was arrested for “disorder in public places” after he shouted “Hong Kong is my country”. Again, he was released unconditionally the same evening because the police hasn’t got sufficient evidence.

Many believe that the police is trying to set an example. Billy is an easy target – let’s face it, he doesn’t have the “good boy” face, and he was caught in cameras repeatedly for shouting out loud, and what’s more: he’s young and pro-HK independence.

I’m sure you know that Anti-Secession Law is very strict in China, a random blog post could be sufficient enough for years of imprisonment. But thankfully, after 500,000 people took it to the street in 2003, Article 23 didn’t go through in Hong Kong.

Imagine if Article 23 goes ahead (it is believed that pushing for Article 23 is one of CY Leung’s political missions alongside of National Education), this chap could be sentenced for life!

Treasure our freedoms, and continue to fight for what we want. Why is it a crime to demand democracy? If democracy doesn’t fit China’s taste, let us be. Leave us alone. Why is China so obsessed with the “unification of Greater China”? Taiwan is an independent country, there’s no doubt about it. Why can’t they simply stop harassing yellow skin and black hair folks?

The world, be warned. China’s expansionism isn’t going to stop until it conquer the world. Look at the number of Chinese immigrating to every countries in the world! They want to be the only power in the world, their ambition is so clear. Why isn’t any of the world leaders aware of it? Why isn’t any of them doing something about it? Kowtowing to China will not warrant you safety, but it’s like a famous ancient saying from The Six Nations Theory “…bringing firewood to extinguish fire. Unless all firewood is burnt out, the fire will not die”. What the world is doing is dangerous, do not be fooled by the Chinese.

Over and out.

China FA: HK Footballer is a Foreigner

One interesting news in today’s Apple Daily (19/July):

Yapp Hung Fai is the goalie of Hong Kong’s First Division League club South China. Guizhou Renhe Football Club, a China Super League club, offered Yapp a 5 years contract and he’s supposed to join the club end of June.

There are some recent personnel changes in the China Football Association and quoted some sort of regulations that say China football teams cannot hire goalkeepers from Hong Kong and Macau, and refused to allow Yapp, a “foreign nationality” to join Guizhou Renhe.

So, even China comes out to admit that they don’t see Hong Kongers as its own people! This makes me smile – they keep banging on about how “blood is thicker than water” when there are earthquakes or floods, they keep banging on about Hong Kongers should tolerate their barbarian behaviours (defecating in the middle of the street and on the train, for example) because “Hong Kongers are Chinese too”.

Hong Kongers ARE NOT China citizens. For those who own HKSAR passport, you are free to travel to China, but you’ll never be a citizen of China, that is, you can’t get a China passport. So much of “one big family”! What a load of crap.

If you trust the Chinese (again, Chinese in China, not referring to ethnicity), it will cost you!

Over and out

Chinese Condemn Man U. HK Supporters for Not Saying They’re from “Hong Kong, China”

As Sir Ferguson led the Manchester United football team the very last time at Old Trafford Stadium, a couple of Hong Kong supporters flew all the way to show their gratitude to their hero, a legendary manager.

I’d imagine that if an Irish man was in the same situation, he would signed off as “from Ireland”, and Scottish fellow would very likely to sign it off as “from Scotland”.

However, after this photo was published online, “complaints” started flooding to the forums, condemning this Man. U. fan for not writing “Hong Kong, China” in his handmade signage.

Hong Kong netizens, of course, immediately felt the comments made by Chinese (from China) offensive – after all, during the time when the Brits ruled Hong Kong, and their appearance (DNA, blood, whatever) is very different from Hong Kongers, they have never demanded Hong Kongers to call themselves British Hong Konger, nor would they required us to say we are from “Hong Kong, British Colony”.

A little fact to show Hong Kong is separated from China: when someone wants to dial a Hong Kong number from elsewhere in the world, the country code is +852 as oppose to China’s +86.

This is not the first time Chinese from China are upset about Hong Kongers refusing to say they are from China or refused to call themselves Chinese. Badcanto, a friendly blogger, wrote a lot about this kind of “conflicts”.

For some reason, Chinese always say Hong Kongers are Chinese when they need help from Hong Kongers (e.g. after the Sichuan earthquakes, which HK government donated billions of dollars in different occasions despite the majority of the public is against the donation as people of Hong Kong cannot trust any funding could reach the victims but the corrupt officials, they would use the “excuse” of “blood is thicker than water” – isn’t this used to described real blood relatives? Since when this applies to a nationality, which is something that everyone can choose?).

However, when Hong Kong people tell Chinese off for their uncivilised behaviours (e.g. answering nature’s call in the public, not queuing, being rude, spitting, littering, smuggling formula powder, etc) or say that CCP is evil, Chinese would go crazy and tell Hong Kongers to leave Hong Kong as Hong Kong is China’s land and Hong Kongers should not continue to live in Hong Kong (our home!) if we do not like China!

One of the “argument” when they come across Hong Kongers saying they’re not Chinese or Hong Kongers pointing out that Chinese are rude/impolite/not civilised (many incidents we witness day in day out), they would simply reply “with black hair and yellow skin, you are Chinese too! So you don’t have the right to tell your ‘fellow Chinese’ off.”

Not everyone with black hair and yellow skin is not Chinese – last time I check Japanese and Korean are with black hair and yellow(-ish) skin (as opposed to Caucasians) too! Some extremist in China would say “of course Japanese and Korean are Chinese! Their ancestors went to Japan and Korea back in the old days.” Isn’t this hilarious? I have yet to meet any English who would say Americans and Australians are all English. At the same time, many American who were originally from other countries would not call themselves Italian, English, African or anything if their families have been there for long enough.

By the way, Tibetans don’t look like Chinese based on the skin and hair colour standard, but why is Tibet part of China? This can go on! I came across this article, which explains a bit of how this kind of mind set is formed.

Chip Tsao, a famous columnist and radio talk-show host, once said that Chinese as well as the government in China are experts at “moving the goal posts” – that means the rule are set by them but they can move it around whichever way they want to ensure that they would always win the game. I can’t agree more on this front – Chinese and especially the officials are indeed experts in bending the rules the way that favour them!

Saw the below example recently, and reminded me about Mr. Tsao’s comment above:

At a Foreign Ministry’s press conference, a journalist asked the ministry’s spokesperson Hua Chunying why China has to implement the “online real name system”.

Hua said, “everyone needs to be responsible for what they say. Some people use the internet to spread rumours, so the ‘real name system’ must be implemented.”

Journalist followed up, “Is every one responsible for their behaviours then? If so, why hasn’t anyone taken the responsibility of the Jerry-built buildings in Sichuan which killed a lot of children?

Hua replied, “this is a different matter!”

National Education Centre Asks Schools for Endorsement

Following on my previous post about National and Moral Education Curriculum, despite the fact that the Curriculum is quietly embedded in various subjects, the National Education Centre continues to work on establishing a new subject for students in Hong Kong in order to further brainwash children.

SupportNationalEducationAbove picture obtained from House News, for original article in Cantonese/Chinese, please refer to here.

The National Education Centre issued letters to all schools in Hong Kong, which provides a simple letter that says:

Dear Sir/Madam,

Since the National Education Centre always strives to promote national education and national quality education, I am happy to support the Centre to continue servicing the education sector and its continuous operation.

Best regards,

____________

Cheung Yui-Fai, a liberal studies teacher, posted the letter onto the Facebook page of National Education Parents’ Concern Group. As a committee member of the Hong Kong Professional Teachers’ Union, Cheung questioned the agenda behind the Centre’s letter – does this mean the biased National Education Curriculum is returning in full form (base on the “coincident” of the HKSAR government’s mentioned National Education in its Human Rights report which was submitted to the United Nation recently).

Cheung also added that the Centre has not done anything ever since the people won the “war” which forced the HKSAR government to “shelved” the curriculum.

On the second page of the letter issued by the Centre, a survey asked the schools if they have participate any of the activities organised by the Centre and what recommendations they have for the activities.

In the Human Rights report submitted to the United Nation, Chapter 2.21, says “This new initiative is expected to be implemented in the 2013/14 school year to further enhance the elements of national education”, and completely omitted the fact that the HKSAR government has announced the curriculum is shelved in September 2012.

Queen’s Road East – 90’s Canto-Pop

Queen’s Road East is a Canto-pop written in 1991, when Hong Kong’s future was determined by the British government and PRC government where Hong Kong people had absolutely no say. This song reflects the confusion of Hong Kongers and our fear for the Communist and PRC. If you watch the MTV carefully, you’d notice there are scenes of people and cars moving backward, a metaphor to symbolism that Hong Kong will go backward after the handover of sovereignty.

The lyrics is full of metaphor. Strongly illustrating Hong Kongers desperation and helplessness about our future.

Hope you’d enjoy the MTV and the lyrics translated below:

Queen’s Road West and Queen’s Road East
Queen’s Road East turns into Queen’s Road Central
Queen’s Road Central is crowded with people

Our royal friend is on the back of coins
Forever young and named the Queen
Follows me everywhere to do all sorts of trade
With an expressionless face that represents success

A dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
Where properties are available everywhere, people carry on buying and selling
But Mong Kok* may have to change its name

This rightful friend is familiar and friendly
Hence, allowing horses to race only twice a week
People, therefore, naturally compete to cross the finishing line
If you wish to be a citizens of the great nation, all it requires is money

Our dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
The hot and cold weather still affects this city
But we may have to seek help from people with supernatural power for a change of weather

Emptiness is form, form is emptiness**
Emptiness is form, form is emptiness…

This beautiful friend says goodbye in class
The same picture shown on TV every night
When the day of celebration comes, everyone has to applause
The respectable face on the back of coins turns into statues of martyrs

Our dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
The railways, buses and taxis will run all the same
But one may not know the routes anymore

* Mong Kok is a famous district with lots of hawker stalls, but have changed massively because of the influx of PRC Chinese tourists

** A famous Buddhist quote

1st Jan 2013 – Major protest in Hong Kong

This protest was first talked about by a bunch of netizens who detest China Government’s illegal (according to Basic Law and Sino-British Joint Declaration) influence in Hong Kong. These people started talking about a protest on the new year’s day back in around November 2012.

Unfortunately, various political parties heard about this protest and started taking credit for this by claiming that they initiated it. Those who are truly independent and initiated it were not happy about it but if these politicians and organisations genuinely want to make Hong Kong a better place and share the same view (Mr. CY Leung, the Chief Executive of HKSAR to step down, universal suffrage, and a referendum on people’s constitutions), there is nothing to worry about.

The truth is, demonstration has long been dominated by a handful of political organisations. Every march in Hong Kong follows the same routine: gather at Victoria Park (the largest public park on Hong Kong Island, which is close to the heart of the government HQ) , then walk along the main roads which will be blockaded by the police ahead of time, within a certain period of time people in the rally have to arrive at a designated protest zone -> the “organiser” announces that the demonstration is a success (yet what’s been achieved is always the question) and urges protesters to go home…

This is exactly why nothing ever results from the numerous protests in Hong Kong in the past 15 years – Hong Kong is a colony of the People’s Republic of China, which is communist, perhaps more preciously, dictatorship. No dictator would ever listen to its people unless riots and violent demonstration kicks off.

“If you make peaceful revolution impossible you make violent revolution inevitable” – J.F. Kennedy

Somehow, people in Hong Kong are always very proud of themselves for being “peaceful, rational, and non-violent” during demonstration. They condemn the slightest anomaly (e.g. shouting at the police so that they will allow people to continue to rally) in a rally.

The “protest” in the 1st January 2013 march were once again hijacked by a political organisation. It seems like no body dares to walk on the street without a couple of “leaders”. Unfortunately, given their standard formula of demonstration, it was a complete failure, once again. Nothing’s achieved, nothings changed.

This year, a very very different form of protest happened. Around a dozen or twenty people who were wearing Guy Fawkes masks marched down to the cross road in the middle of Central, the centre of the Hong Kong Island and the financial and business centre of the city-state.

They sit down in the middle of the cross-road on a public holiday during non peak hour, blockading two main roads to make a clear statement to Hong Kong people, SAR government and international media that they are no longer content with what’s happening to their home.

This is the reason I detailed the “standard way” of Hong Kong style demonstration earlier. This group of Vs (V for Vendetta) is not from any sort of organisation, and they have one thing in common – passionate about Hong Kong, their home. Here’s an impromptu statement given by one of them who holds a handheld amplifier gave on the spot. In short, he was raising the questions about why Hong Kong people are tolerating the SAR government’s incompetence.

Very soon, people who were walking on the street started shouting at the masked protesters:

“You have the right to protest, but you should protest outside the government headquarters!”
“It’s wrong to cause inconvenience to people who aren’t in the protest! If you want CY Leung to step down, go to the Government House and tell him!””You people have nothing better to do! A bunch of losers!”
“You are blockading the road making your point, and I can’t go home!”

I was watching all these and feeling heart broken – why are these people so blind? There is no violence involved in this demonstration, and yet people do not appreciate what some of them put their liberty and safety behind to fight for them? (One of them got arrested at the end)

There were some, however, who read about the masked protesters online (Facebook, online media, etc), and went down to support.

The masked protesters were soon surrounded by police – no more than 20 masked protesters and over 200 hundred police officers. The protesters were about to retreat and head for another spot, and one of them who was further away from the rest was tackled by at least one police officer like in a rugby game, and fall over.

Soon, other organised groups went to the same location. They had no choice because the police were blockading all the routes to the Government House, and all these routes were agreed by the police when the organisers applied for the demonstration. The police blockaded all the roads, which major traffic go by 24 hours, and soon one of the representatives of the police force went on TV and condemned the protesters for disrupting the peace. Kwok-Hung Leung (nickname: Long Hair), one of the Legislative Council members participated in numerous demonstrations, was surrounded by over 300 hundred police in the middle of the road on his own, and was later on charged for illegal assembly.

In different parts of Central, some of the protesters were trapped between police cordons, and one senior officer (recorded on tape) shouted at the protesters that “do not let them leave” and ordered his subordinates to surround the protesters.

VJMedia, an independent online media (relatively new), published a very detail and probably the most unbiased article illustrating the details of what exactly happened during the march. I’m not translating it here, but if i receive any request (even one!) I’ll translate it for the English readers.

Please leave your comments.

2012 Report to Congress U.S.-CHINA ECONOMIC AND SECURITY REVIEW COMMISSION

I bumped into a Cantonese blog yesterday, and think this is a minor positive progress.

Approximately 30 pages in the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission Report are reporting on Hong Kong, a few key points are highlighted below:

1. Pro-Beijing parties enjoyed a financial advantage over their rivals, which enabled them to build extensive logistical networks to mobilize voters and exploit Hong Kong’s electoral peculiarities. (p.267)

2. Babies born in the territory enjoy the privileges of Hong Kong citizenship: access to the city’s superior health and education systems, and greater freedom to travel and settle inside and outside China.(p.267)

3. So-called ‘‘birth-tourism’’ quickly became a hot-button issue, with some going so far as to depict mainland Chinese as ‘‘locusts.’(p.268)

4. Censorship controversies at the South China Morning Post, one of Hong Kong’s most prominent newspapers, increased following the appointment of Wang Xingwei as editor-in-chief in January 2012. Mr. Wang, a former China Daily reporter, concurrently serves as a member of Jilin Province’s Political Consultative Conference, 424 a Chinese Communist Party-selected and -controlled organization. In June, he was accused of censoring coverage of the death of Li Wangyang, a well-known Chinese dissident. (p.270)

5. The city’s public schools were going to be required to begin teach- ing a course in ‘‘moral and national education’’ by 2015, which some called a thinly veiled ‘‘brainwashing’’ effort evocative of the Cultural Revolution.(p.272)

6. Beijing’s increasing influence in Hong Kong’s affairs calls into question the security of advanced technology products exported from the United States to Hong Kong.(p.273)

7. Congress reauthorize Section 301 of the U.S.-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992, which requires the U.S. secretary of State to submit an annual report to Congress on political, economic, and social developments in Hong Kong of relevance to the United States. This should include reporting on mainland interference in Hong Kong’s internal political affairs and Chinese efforts to leverage the territory as a platform for the internationalization of the RMB.(p.274)

8. Congress review the U.S.-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992 to deter- mine its continued applicability. In particular, Congress should review the security of advanced technology products exported from the United States to Hong Kong.(p.274)

9. Members of Congress, when visiting mainland China, also visit Hong Kong and that Congress encourage senior administration officials, including the secretary of State, to make visits to Hong Kong part of their travel.(p.274)

Glad to know that the US is monitoring Hong Kong closely, and I hope the US will actually react and stop the PRC from further interfering Hong Kong’s autonomy, and gradually Hong Kong can go independent!