Anchor Baby – Great Trick Chinese Pull Off!

How do you force the Hong Kong SAR government to do something? As a Chinese woman demostrated today at the Immigration Office – Behave like a rascal!

By rolling on the floor and refuse to get up or threaten the government for leaving your baby behind:

Anchor babies should not be given permanent residency. No one who come to live in Hong Kong can get that without staying in HK for over seven years. Why were these anchor babies automatically granted citizenship and permanent residency because they have yellow skin and black hair?

Anchor baby’s mother lied down on the floor because the Immigration refused to issue a HK birth certificate to her daughter

The government surrendered in five hours and issue her daughter a HK birth certificate! This means she can enjoy all the benefits Hong Kong citizens can enjoy because they or their parents pay tax!

Remember all the protests Hong Kongers participated over the past 16 years? Have we got anything we demand? Absolutely NOTHING!

Next time, when Hong Kongers protest, we should just lie down on the ground and refuse to move until what we demand is satisfied.

Oh! Wait! If Hong Kongers protest and refuse to cooperate with the police, they will issue a warrant and you can become a wanted person for 2 years. Or, the police will arrest and charge you for Violation of Public Order!

In a nutshell, Hong Kongers are the inferior race (or probably minority) in Hong Kong – if the Chinese (from China) want to do anything they simply do it, and will never face any consequences, but if you are unfortunate enough to be a Hong Konger? Sorry, tough luck!

Over and out

(Very angry, by the way. Who does the HKSAR government serve? Clearly not the people of Hong Kong!)

National Education Centre Asks Schools for Endorsement

Following on my previous post about National and Moral Education Curriculum, despite the fact that the Curriculum is quietly embedded in various subjects, the National Education Centre continues to work on establishing a new subject for students in Hong Kong in order to further brainwash children.

SupportNationalEducationAbove picture obtained from House News, for original article in Cantonese/Chinese, please refer to here.

The National Education Centre issued letters to all schools in Hong Kong, which provides a simple letter that says:

Dear Sir/Madam,

Since the National Education Centre always strives to promote national education and national quality education, I am happy to support the Centre to continue servicing the education sector and its continuous operation.

Best regards,

____________

Cheung Yui-Fai, a liberal studies teacher, posted the letter onto the Facebook page of National Education Parents’ Concern Group. As a committee member of the Hong Kong Professional Teachers’ Union, Cheung questioned the agenda behind the Centre’s letter – does this mean the biased National Education Curriculum is returning in full form (base on the “coincident” of the HKSAR government’s mentioned National Education in its Human Rights report which was submitted to the United Nation recently).

Cheung also added that the Centre has not done anything ever since the people won the “war” which forced the HKSAR government to “shelved” the curriculum.

On the second page of the letter issued by the Centre, a survey asked the schools if they have participate any of the activities organised by the Centre and what recommendations they have for the activities.

In the Human Rights report submitted to the United Nation, Chapter 2.21, says “This new initiative is expected to be implemented in the 2013/14 school year to further enhance the elements of national education”, and completely omitted the fact that the HKSAR government has announced the curriculum is shelved in September 2012.

Queen’s Road East – 90’s Canto-Pop

Queen’s Road East is a Canto-pop written in 1991, when Hong Kong’s future was determined by the British government and PRC government where Hong Kong people had absolutely no say. This song reflects the confusion of Hong Kongers and our fear for the Communist and PRC. If you watch the MTV carefully, you’d notice there are scenes of people and cars moving backward, a metaphor to symbolism that Hong Kong will go backward after the handover of sovereignty.

The lyrics is full of metaphor. Strongly illustrating Hong Kongers desperation and helplessness about our future.

Hope you’d enjoy the MTV and the lyrics translated below:

Queen’s Road West and Queen’s Road East
Queen’s Road East turns into Queen’s Road Central
Queen’s Road Central is crowded with people

Our royal friend is on the back of coins
Forever young and named the Queen
Follows me everywhere to do all sorts of trade
With an expressionless face that represents success

A dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
Where properties are available everywhere, people carry on buying and selling
But Mong Kok* may have to change its name

This rightful friend is familiar and friendly
Hence, allowing horses to race only twice a week
People, therefore, naturally compete to cross the finishing line
If you wish to be a citizens of the great nation, all it requires is money

Our dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
The hot and cold weather still affects this city
But we may have to seek help from people with supernatural power for a change of weather

Emptiness is form, form is emptiness**
Emptiness is form, form is emptiness…

This beautiful friend says goodbye in class
The same picture shown on TV every night
When the day of celebration comes, everyone has to applause
The respectable face on the back of coins turns into statues of martyrs

Our dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
The railways, buses and taxis will run all the same
But one may not know the routes anymore

* Mong Kok is a famous district with lots of hawker stalls, but have changed massively because of the influx of PRC Chinese tourists

** A famous Buddhist quote

Leaders of the PRC (China)

Pro-democracy, pro-HK-Independence and anti-CCP Facebook groups have been circulating an image in recent days – direct quotes from Premier Wen JiaBao’s government work report. Below is a translation of the caption:

43 Rounds of Applause 5 Years Ago…

“(We can) definitely guarantee the basic stability of market supply and market price”

“Make our motherland’s mountains greener, water clearer, sky more blue”

“We must ensure that our people’s minds are at easy when they eat and use (products), and make our export products to enjoy good reputation”

“(We will allow) everyone to enjoy basic health care services”

“We must be determined to push forward (our) real estate reform and development, making people and the public to live in peace and enjoy one’s work (note: a Chinese saying which means a stable and secured life with a roof above one’s head)”

“Only through distributing the fruits of economic development to the public, the harmony and stability of a society can be improved”

Five years have passed, NONE of the above was achieved.

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Communist Chinese Rule Hong Kong

1st March 2013, Friday

Communist Youth League of China’s Plan to Rule HK – Ethnic Cleansing

We often hear that the ultimate targets for Mainland Chinese students are the US and the UK and Hong Kong is only a stepping stone. This is correct, but is only the partial fact.

The top trench of Chinese students, of course, leaves China. Those who have strong family background (i.e. parents being senior government officials) will return to China so to become the new officials. The truth is, 80 million of China’s 1.3 billion populations are Communist Party members, and the second generation of the low to middle ranking government officials wants to get “benefits” too.

It is not very difficult for Chinese to study abroad, and it is not especially hard for them to find a job in the West either. However, the high tax rate and mediocre salary in the West, plus their level of English isn’t universally high and the most difficult part of all is to integrate into the western society. This conclusion is based on the observation that Chinese students in Hong Kong failed to integrate into Hong Kong, and those in the rest of the world tend to gather in their local China Towns. It shows that the number of Chinese students who can integrate into the western world is limited. Given the number of Chinese students in other countries, the number of those who make it is still substantial.

Where in the world is easy to immigrate, with low income tax rate and a government that favours Chinese? The answer is Hong Kong! Chinese who study in the UK cannot apply for neutralisation unless they have been living in the UK for ten years. But in Hong Kong, all it takes is to study a MA, a one year programme, and apply for work visa and they can immediately become Hong Kong residents. This is the same as hospital selling labour ward space to Chinese and give a Hong Kong ID card to the new born for free: universities sell their degrees and attach a “free” Hong Kong ID card. As the number of highly-educated people that work in hospitals is very limited compare to those who teach at universities, every time when people raise questions about the university selling degree to Chinese, people jump out to defend this system and glorify it as a measure to “resolve the aging population in Hong Kong” and to “introduce top quality professionals to Hong Kong”.

China’s ethnic cleansing plan on Hong Kong started way back. In recent years, you can see a lot of young men and women, the children of senior, middle and low ranking government officials in China, in Hong Kong. These people came to Hong Kong to study, and obtain their Hong Kong ID and take the Hong Kong government funded scholarships to study their Masters in Ivy League, Cambridge and Oxford. They then returned to Hong Kong as professionals, for example, barristers, solicitors and iBankers, and live in luxurious places. Those who are not professionals, take a linguistic degree, study in translation, work in the cultural and arts space, or even become columnists. Why would they take up any opportunities in Hong Kong? The answer is simple: Hong Kong is way better than the hell China. A Hong Kong ID card is almost like insurance to them – for example, Lai ChangXing and Gu KaiLai both hold Hong Kong ID cards.

The HKSAR Government Scholarship Fund is a reward for the Communist Youth League of China. You don’t believe it? Let me explain to you. A few years ago, CEPA secretly introduced a scheme that is tailored for Mainland Chinese, allowing them to convert their licences to Hong Kong driving licenses for free. In less than six years, a total over 85,000 Hong Kong driving licenses were issued to Mainland Chinese (there are only 400,000 private cars in Hong Kong, there is no need to issue so many driving licenses) [my note: HK’s road system and traffic regulations are very different from those in China]. According to BBC’s report in February 2012, a record of over 13,000 Hong Kong driving license holders attempted to convert into the UK driving license in two years. A tiny Hong Kong bet the rest of the world in this incident. Years ago, we have predicted that this new measure is for Mainland Chinese to con the world. People didn’t believe in us, and eventually the UK government amended its law this January to close the loophole which seems to be targeting Hong Kong: “to convert to UK driving license applicants must passed the driving test at the issued destination” – which means Hong Kong license issued to individuals who took the driving test in Hong Kong, but not Hong Kong license converted from a China license, can be converted into UK license – A tailor made measure targeting Mainland Chinese students.

In time, the Communist Youth League of China and offspring of low to middle ranking China government officials will come to Hong Kong to study (for example, international school), then endorsed by the HKSAR government to study abroad, and return to Hong Kong as Hong Kong permanent residence to teach National and Moral Education for a couple years. They will also at the same time, participate in arts competitions, join advisory organization, HKSAR’s Central Policy Unit, and all of a sudden become part of the HKSAR government, and in a few years the leaders of Hong Kong to rule Hong Kong.

These have been happening for at least eight to ten years. Many genuine Hong Kongers still dream about “establishing a free China”, and fail to realize that China has already successfully planted the seeds of and executing “the great plan of Communists ruling Hong Kong”!

Kay Lam, a local Hong Kong columnist

Follow up on Beijing Woman Slams Hong Kong Movie “Vulgaria”

Please refer to my last post Beijing Woman Slams Hong Kong Movie “Vulgaria” to get an understanding of this news.

After investigations, the netizens and media found out a bit more about this prize winner. Jia XuanNing wrote another “critic piece” on a China produced movie “Lost in Thailand (泰囧)” which was openly accused by the Thailand government for insulting Thai people. Ms. Jia praised this movie in her critic and said that “(the movie) brings popular fun to the pre-Lunar New Year dullness in China”. The movie itself, according to sources and Thai people, blatantly smears the Thai. Ms. Jia’s critic piece is available in Simplified Chinese here.

Columnists today, in response to this new “discovery”, wrote a fair few pieces (example 1 and 2). In short, they think that Ms. Jia is “double standard” and “is a typical China Communist party member – who defends China and Chinese blindly even though they are in the wrong”.

According to netizens, in a nut shell, the mentality of China Communists is: people outside of China (that is the rest of the world including Hong Kong) who portrait the negatives of Chinese and China are discriminating Chinese because they envy China’s wealth, but Chinese can do whatever they like (mocking other races, calling Caucasians names despite faking a smile in front of them, etc) and Chinese people would glorify their acts and use propaganda to influence (some call it “brainwash”) other Chinese people; and the outsiders (including Hong Kongers) is wrong about doing a certain thing, but it’s perfectly ok for Chinese to do the same thing.

In Ms. Jia’s critic piece on “Lost in Thailand” she said the complete opposite of what she wrote in the critic about the HK movie Vulgaria:

China produced comedy may create a new style of “Lunar New Year movie”, to demonstrate a stronger local character (of China) to the world.

In her critic on Vulgaria (the HK produced movie that targets HK locals), Ms. Jia said that the sarcasm of Chinese in Vulgaria is discriminating Chinese (Ms. Jia is accused to have selectively ignored the fact that the movie makes fun of local Hong Kongers most of the time).

A few columnists said that Ms. Jia is only a higher paid “50 cents” (she won HK$50,000 for what she wrote about Vulgaria). Newspapers also reported today that Ms. Jia is closely related to the judge panel of this prize, which is supported by the HKSAR government (that is tax payers are funding it). Some said that this is only a little step of China’s influence and propaganda to brainwash and “correct” Hong Kongers’ feelings against Chinese.

 

Beijing Woman Slams Hong Kong Movie “Vulgaria”

Vulgaria, a locally produced comedy filled with hilarious satire. The focus of this movie is about “how hard it is to be in the movie industry” – behind the glorious surface of the entertainment industry, it is actually very tough.

For some reason and not sure when, swearing is no longer accepted in Hong Kong movies. Since when thugs speak without swearing is beyond me, but this is how ridiculous the censorship in Hong Kong has become – one step closer to China, perhaps.

This movie won a lot of support from the Hong Kongers because characters in this movie seem much more alive and real than many Hong Kong-China joint productions. Hong Kongers can relate themselves and believe that those characters actually exist! It may not be an Oscars grade, according to netizens and commentators, but very real Hong Kong story, a hysterical mocking/reflection of the movie industry and, most importantly, funny.

Image

Hong Kongers think that nothing is wrong for locally produced movies targeting the locals. Many also agree that swearing exists in every corner in the world, and shouldn’t be made a huge fuzz about such – swearing is quite common in movies made by the West. Many audiences said they enjoyed the laughs and find it a unique movie in the current market, which is dominated by well funded movies targeting the China market, meaning censorship (nothing bad about China and there are cases whereby movies have to “change” history to praise China) and not “real” enough.

A Peking (Beijing) young woman wrote a critic piece about this movie, slamming how “vulgar” this movie is (the movie is called “Vularia”). Hong Kongers think that she’s using a very political view on her critic piece instead of approaching it from an art appreciation/critic point of view. Her piece won her the Gold ADC Critic’s Prize (cash award of HK$50,000) – the judge panel was found to be closely connected to the China government and the writer. Bottom of this blog post is an English report for your reference.

Her prize caused massive public discontent in Hong Kong, mainly against her not-art-critic view point on the movie, and fuels Hong Kongers’ worry about China’s propaganda and plan to colonise Hong Kong by penetrating into Hong Kong – legal system (recent prosecution of protesters who joint a rally approved by the government), education (national and moral education), clean government (Chief Executives and many other influential figures in Hong Kong are alleged to be underground Community Party members), the influx of China immigrants, the increasing use of simplified Chinese characters in the public, the use of Putonghua (Mandarin) in school instead of Cantonese (the native language of Hong Kong – for the record, Cantonese is recognised by the UN as a language and over 100 million people in the world are using it) etc. This time, is the arts space and movie industry.

According to some, this kind of penetration programme is a technique the China government has been using in the past 60-plus years since it was established.

The freedoms in Hong Kong, a land with a history of over 170 years, is being eroded ever since the handover of sovereignty back in 1997.

Critique of Critic’s Prize Award

Written by Alice Poon (潘慧嫻)

Wednesday, 27 February 2013

The Hong Kong Arts Development Council’s award of a Gold ADC Critic’s Prize (the first of its kind) to a local journalist Jia Xuanning for her critical essay on the film “Vulgar Comedy” (“低俗喜劇”) has stirred up much controversy. The essay itself is under caustic attack from liberal-minded Hong Kongers.

Here are translated excerpts from another retort article by an InmediaHK writer:-

“I have commented from a cultural viewpoint. Now let me give a critique on the latter half of the essay from a social viewpoint.  The essay points out [the Mainland may well act as Hong Kong’s benevolent master, but it has not won Hong Kongers’ heart. On the one hand Hong Kongers bow to the Mainland’s economic prowess, while on the other refuse to let go of their residual sense of superiority on the mental level. This paradoxical mentality is like the psychological struggle of the film’s character played by Du: he shows an obsequious smiling face, while at heart he feels he’s being raped; they feel alienated from the mainlanders’s ‘inferiority’, yet they are being naturalized and glossed over. In the face of the Mainland, Hong Kong senses a loss of self-esteem and a collapse of the last line of defense with no power to retaliate, and in the end the already sickly relationship between the two places will only exacerbate.] (I’ve quoted this from the original essay, to avoid being accused of taking remarks out of context.) Jia’s essay smacks of imperialist mentality, full of condescension, insinuating that Hong Kongers are subservient to money, that being rich is almighty (as implied by ‘benevolent master’). Yet, Jia does not have a clear perception of reality. To say that Hong Kongers are jealous of mainlanders’ wealth is pure conjecture. According to IMF data, Hong Kong has a GDP per capita of close to US$36,000, while the Mainland’s figure is around US$6,000. Hong Kong is the Mainland third largest export partner (the first two being the European Union and the United States). The PRC’s Commerce Department data shows that Hong Kong’s investment in Mainland China amounts to US$600 billion, i.e. 46 percent of all of its foreign investment. As is apparent from data of different sources, the Mainland has to rely on Hong Kong.”

筆者已經批評《從》的文化觀點,今批評文中後部的社會觀點。文中指「大陸可以做香港的恩主,卻無法收服港人的心,港人臣服於大陸在經濟層面的強盛,卻又決計不肯放棄精神層面殘存的優越感,這種一邊依賴、一邊排斥的矛盾關係,令港人對大陸的心態正像片中杜汶澤那樣掙扎:表面曲意賣笑,內心卻感到在「被強姦」;既不能認同大陸人的「低質素」,又在被不斷同化與浸淫。當香港在大陸這個「他者」面前,感到尊嚴流失、底線崩塌又偏偏無力還擊時,病態的中港關係便愈演愈烈。」(此處為原文,免得指筆者斷章取義)。賈氏的文章充斥帝國主義者的心態,如君臨天下的駕馭港人,以為有錢大晒,暗指港人為奴才(恩主的暗示)。然而,賈氏沒有看清現實。若果論香港人妒忌大陸人有錢,卻是無中生有。根據國際貨幣基金組織的數據,香港人均本地生產總值為近三萬六千多美元,而中國大陸為六千多美元,香港的人均本地生產總值足足多大陸六倍。香港為中國第三的出口顆伴(依次為歐盟,美國),達近百分之十四。根據中華人民共和國商務部外國投資管理司的數據,香港對大陸的投達近六千億美元,佔中國境外投資的百分之四十六,為各國最高。從各方面的數據,大陸都必須依靠香港。當年戈爾巴喬夫說俄羅斯的經濟改革比大陸更困難,因為沒有香港。

“Even without mentioning the mutually beneficial economic co-operation, the Mainland is still indebted to Hong Kong from the historical standpoint. During the Great Leap Forward when 30 million Chinese were starving to death (I do not know whether Jia has read about this part of Chinese history?), Hong Kongers selflessly extended help to the Mainland. More recently, whenever there were natural disasters like floods and earthquakes, Hong Kongers, apart from donating money generously, were involved in a series of rehabilitation hope -projects. On the other hand, the so-called tourism benefits brought about by the individual travel scheme are only concentrated in sales of luxury goods and local properties, to the detriment of local small and medium businesses. The real effect of that scheme is to enrich the few conglomerates; it does not benefit the average citizen at all. Indeed, citizens have had to bear the negatives, like street congestion, bad behaviors of travelers, parallel trades and a whole lot of resource distribution problems. I would urge Jia to take a fuller view of facts before writing, and would beseech the award panelists to use their common sense in making judgment.”

先不論互惠互利的經濟合作,從歷史看,大陸仍是虧欠香港。當年大躍進餓死三千萬人(不知賈氏讀中國歷史時有沒有這段歷史?),香港人無條件接濟大陸。改革開放後,中國發生的天災人禍,例如華東水災,四川大地震等,香港人捐了無數的資金,還有一系列的希望工程。大陸有錢人不做的,香港人全都包了上身。然而,自由行帶來的所謂消費,高度集中在奢侈品和樓,排斥了本地的中小企業。而掌控奢侈品的,卻是本土大財閥,自由行的結果就是助長財團,一般市民根本不能得益。另一方面,一般市民卻要承受負面的外部成本,例如阻街,自由行影響市容的行為,水貸問題和一系列資源分配問題等等。請賈氏寫文章前,好好看清現實,並請評審員判斷時,運用你們的常識。

“On another issue, the essay mentions that the film ‘Vulgar Comedy’ discriminates against mainlanders because one of the characters in the film played by Cheng mocks at mainlanders, which reflects a fear that Hong Kongers harbor. First of all, the film is not discriminatory towards mainlanders, as that character is a nouveau-riche plebeian and is not representative of all mainlanders. What the film tries to mock are the philistine habits of some nouveau-riche commoners – it does not amount to discrimination. However, what Jia says about Hong Kongers’ fear is correct, but for the wrong reason. Starting from the day of the handover, the Central Government has constantly been chipping away Hong Kongers’ freedom, trying arrogantly to domesticate Hong Kong with the Mainland’s officialdom way of handling things. It even mentions co-operation of the three powers. Now Hong Kong enjoys less and less freedom. Dissidents are suppressed. A society attuned to lies is in the making, thanks to the Central and Hong Kong SAR governments. The freedoms that we enjoy are a natural endowment – they are not granted by the Basic Law. We are being robbed of those freedoms. Certainly we have good reason to fear.”

此外,文中提及《低》歧視大陸人,因為鄭中基所演的角色是嘲弄大陸人,反映出香港人對大陸的恐懼。她的說法部分正確。第一,《低》並沒有種族歧視,因為鄭中基所演的角色是大陸的暴發戶,而非指所有大陸人。《低》所嘲笑的,是大陸暴發戶的惡俗,並不構成種族歧視,而且,若果將暴發戶英雄化,恐怕賈小姐亦不能接受。賈氏所說香港人對大陸的恐懼是正確的,不過卻是錯的理由。自主權移交後,中共不斷壓制香港人的自由,妄圖以大陸官場的方式同化香港,更提出所謂三權合作。現今香港的自由越來越少了,反抗者被打壓,變成謊言社會,全都是中共和港共政府所造成。我們所享的自由,理應是天賦,不是《基本法》賦予的,中共像強盜般奪去,港人當然恐懼。

“What should have been an arts critique essay turns out to read more like a social commentary, full of political motives. I cannot but be baffled as to why such an essay could be selected for an award. Is it proper for the Arts Development Council to be thus politically charged? Why has this Council in Hong Kong become so like the Propaganda Department in directing ideology? If such an essay is worthy of an award, then participants in the next competition will probably slant their essays towards ideology. I would rather watch vulgar films than read a work of venomous lies.”

一篇藝術評論文章,竟然寫了社會評論那樣,而且充滿政治動機,令筆者不得不擔心為何《從《低俗喜劇》透視港片焦慮》一文可以得獎。藝發局是否有政治的含義?為何一個香港人的局變成中宣部那麼,指示意識形態?若果這文章可以得獎,那麼下一屆的藝術評論參賽者則可能朝此意識形態寫文章,只怕不久香港爆發一場文化大革命,藝術品服膺於政治命令。我寧可睇低俗的作品,也不想看惡毒的謊言。

Chinese Causes Global Milk Powder Shortage – 2

Since the previous blog post, the HKSAR government (aka, the CCP-HKSAR government) has proposed a new “policy” which is a glorified rationed system: Hong Kong mothers can join “Mother’s Clubs” in Hong Kong which are profit making organisations set up by baby milk powder manufacturers to secure guaranteed supply of three tins every two weeks.

I am most against this “policy”. What this “policy” suggests is that Hong Kong people have to allow Chinese to raid every shop in Hong Kong for formula powder. Many countries who face threats from the Chinese are imposing quota for individuals who purchase formula powder from shops.

Below is a world map of the footprint of Chinese raids for formula powder:

A few things we need to know before we can understand Chinese’s global raid:

First of all, there is an import tax on formula powder in China, ranging from 15% to 20%. In Hong Kong, there is no import tax imposed on baby milk powder.Those who buy in bulk in Hong Kong smuggled those formula powder across the border to China, a clear tax evasion situation. Market rumours (I think no one will doubt it’s in fact the truth) say that China’s customs received bribe from those smuggler groups (RMB10 per each person each time they cross the border with smuggled goods) so that they will not arrest nor prosecute smugglers.

Given that Hong Kong dollar is pegged to the US dollar, Hong Kong dollar is weaker than China’s RMB. Given the general public’s concern over locally produced or imported milk powder through distributors (Chinese think that any imported products that are packaged in China are unsafe), there is a huge demand for formula powder for infants in China.

This sets the background – Chinese have to go overseas (including Hong Kong) to buy safe milk powder to supply the 1.3 billion population’s demand.

How is a country as small as Hong Kong have sufficient supply for a country (China) which is millions times bigger than herself? Why is it Hong Kong’s responsibility to support China’s demand for a type of product that cannot be replaced?

Some argued that if Americans or Germans or people from any other countries would come to raid Hong Kong’s electronic appliances, Hong Kongers would not against it because they are free trade and helps the economy. This is a completely insane metaphor:

  • Baby formula powder = necessity; Electronic appliances = luxury products (involving the elasticity of demand)
  • Hong Kong’s size and supply of milk powder VS China’s size and demand for milk powder
  • Chinese who come to Hong Kong (or any part of the world) do not just purchase a small amount, they buy in absolute bulk
  • Being inconsiderate and selfish, Chinese do not care about if the local babies will suffer. All they care about is: having abundant supply for their own babies and making money from this trade


All of these are fomula powder!

The attitude of Chinese provokes Hong Kongers further, making one can’t help but think: You’re taking advantage of Hong Kong, distorting Hong Kong’s economy and destroying people’s livelihood, yet still claim to be doing good for the Hong Kongers?

A Facebook page posted the below recently about a message posted by a Chinese on Weibo (a China version of Twitter as Twitter isn’t allowed in China because of the censorship) – I’m keeping the Simplified Chinese characters here even though I (and many Hong Kongers) despise this broken language created by the Communists, I will try to write something about this in the near future.

Please note that this is not an isolated case, many people are bragging about their victory in raiding Hong Kong’s formula powder and mocking Hong Kongers as slaves and secondary citizens. Some even said “when the time comes, I will invade Hong Kong armed and kill every traitor and British-running-dog (i.e. Hong Kongers) I spot, so to make sure Hong Kong is part of China for good”:

From Hong Kong & China NOT the SAME 中港大不同

Once again, Mainland Chinese is showing off the milk powder and says this is a GREAT success of the socialism has “defeated” capitalism. They are happy because Hong Kong Mothers couldn’t get the milk powder for Hong Kong babies and they are delighted for Hong Kong government is being controlled by the CCP, so that they can take as much as they want.
THIS IS AN INVASION. Stop telling us to be kind and ‘you have to help to poor’ – We have 1 million “poor” HongKongese and those PRChinese who come to take everything, even stay here, they are NOT that poor. Yet they are trying their best to ruin the city.
WE ARE HONGKONGESE, NOT CHINESE.「我们雄壮的社会主义大军硬是把资本主义的香港活活的从商品经济逼退回计划经济,国人威武啊!给力奶粉今天到货啦!何其壮观啊!看着房间的奶粉墙相当满足!」
不知我這些已為人母的朋友,有何感想?忘恩負義,恩將仇報。請廣傳,是時候捉賊!這根本就是侵略,別再叫我們包容什麼了,香港人不要再大中國主義,要保衞香港
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【原文】
习习在深圳:香港几乎所有的婴幼儿奶粉都被大陆水客抢购一空,有小孩的家庭也买不到奶粉,自由行签注又不归香港政府管,于是只好出台“新办法”——凭票供 应。有婴幼儿的家庭凭出生证可以保证每月买到两罐奶粉。就这样,我们雄壮的社会主义大军硬是把资本主义的香港活活的从商品经济逼退回计划经济,国人威武 啊!
给力奶粉今天到货啦!何其壮观啊!看着房间的奶粉墙相当满足!Leo哥也高兴地呼叫“奶奶,奶奶”!多谢@滚在英国 的辛勤劳动,我拆包装都拆到腰痛,真不知亲你包了多久啊!全5分!继续为我们的口粮奋斗!

Wan Chin, a scholar in Hong Kong, who’s the thought leader of city-state autonomy for Hong Kong commented on the issue about CCP-HKSAR government’s new policy.

Ration, is an extremely measure that responsible government would implement during war time in order to ensure that its people have sufficient daily supply, including food.

Imposing this system in Hong Kong but not controlling the invasion from China is rather putting the cart before the horse!

To protect Hong Kong and Hong Kongers, we must go independent!

Stay tune for more about Hong Kong.

PS: I do apologise that this isn’t the most systematic article – I’m by no means a good writer, and I get too emotional about this subject matter, my god children are very young and this issue makes me very angry

1st Jan 2013 – Major protest in Hong Kong

This protest was first talked about by a bunch of netizens who detest China Government’s illegal (according to Basic Law and Sino-British Joint Declaration) influence in Hong Kong. These people started talking about a protest on the new year’s day back in around November 2012.

Unfortunately, various political parties heard about this protest and started taking credit for this by claiming that they initiated it. Those who are truly independent and initiated it were not happy about it but if these politicians and organisations genuinely want to make Hong Kong a better place and share the same view (Mr. CY Leung, the Chief Executive of HKSAR to step down, universal suffrage, and a referendum on people’s constitutions), there is nothing to worry about.

The truth is, demonstration has long been dominated by a handful of political organisations. Every march in Hong Kong follows the same routine: gather at Victoria Park (the largest public park on Hong Kong Island, which is close to the heart of the government HQ) , then walk along the main roads which will be blockaded by the police ahead of time, within a certain period of time people in the rally have to arrive at a designated protest zone -> the “organiser” announces that the demonstration is a success (yet what’s been achieved is always the question) and urges protesters to go home…

This is exactly why nothing ever results from the numerous protests in Hong Kong in the past 15 years – Hong Kong is a colony of the People’s Republic of China, which is communist, perhaps more preciously, dictatorship. No dictator would ever listen to its people unless riots and violent demonstration kicks off.

“If you make peaceful revolution impossible you make violent revolution inevitable” – J.F. Kennedy

Somehow, people in Hong Kong are always very proud of themselves for being “peaceful, rational, and non-violent” during demonstration. They condemn the slightest anomaly (e.g. shouting at the police so that they will allow people to continue to rally) in a rally.

The “protest” in the 1st January 2013 march were once again hijacked by a political organisation. It seems like no body dares to walk on the street without a couple of “leaders”. Unfortunately, given their standard formula of demonstration, it was a complete failure, once again. Nothing’s achieved, nothings changed.

This year, a very very different form of protest happened. Around a dozen or twenty people who were wearing Guy Fawkes masks marched down to the cross road in the middle of Central, the centre of the Hong Kong Island and the financial and business centre of the city-state.

They sit down in the middle of the cross-road on a public holiday during non peak hour, blockading two main roads to make a clear statement to Hong Kong people, SAR government and international media that they are no longer content with what’s happening to their home.

This is the reason I detailed the “standard way” of Hong Kong style demonstration earlier. This group of Vs (V for Vendetta) is not from any sort of organisation, and they have one thing in common – passionate about Hong Kong, their home. Here’s an impromptu statement given by one of them who holds a handheld amplifier gave on the spot. In short, he was raising the questions about why Hong Kong people are tolerating the SAR government’s incompetence.

Very soon, people who were walking on the street started shouting at the masked protesters:

“You have the right to protest, but you should protest outside the government headquarters!”
“It’s wrong to cause inconvenience to people who aren’t in the protest! If you want CY Leung to step down, go to the Government House and tell him!””You people have nothing better to do! A bunch of losers!”
“You are blockading the road making your point, and I can’t go home!”

I was watching all these and feeling heart broken – why are these people so blind? There is no violence involved in this demonstration, and yet people do not appreciate what some of them put their liberty and safety behind to fight for them? (One of them got arrested at the end)

There were some, however, who read about the masked protesters online (Facebook, online media, etc), and went down to support.

The masked protesters were soon surrounded by police – no more than 20 masked protesters and over 200 hundred police officers. The protesters were about to retreat and head for another spot, and one of them who was further away from the rest was tackled by at least one police officer like in a rugby game, and fall over.

Soon, other organised groups went to the same location. They had no choice because the police were blockading all the routes to the Government House, and all these routes were agreed by the police when the organisers applied for the demonstration. The police blockaded all the roads, which major traffic go by 24 hours, and soon one of the representatives of the police force went on TV and condemned the protesters for disrupting the peace. Kwok-Hung Leung (nickname: Long Hair), one of the Legislative Council members participated in numerous demonstrations, was surrounded by over 300 hundred police in the middle of the road on his own, and was later on charged for illegal assembly.

In different parts of Central, some of the protesters were trapped between police cordons, and one senior officer (recorded on tape) shouted at the protesters that “do not let them leave” and ordered his subordinates to surround the protesters.

VJMedia, an independent online media (relatively new), published a very detail and probably the most unbiased article illustrating the details of what exactly happened during the march. I’m not translating it here, but if i receive any request (even one!) I’ll translate it for the English readers.

Please leave your comments.

Freedoms erode – a blatant violation of the Basic Law and Sino-British Joint Declaration

In light of recent rapid decline in freedoms in Hong Kong, the people of Hong Kong must not stand and watch Hong Kong burn. That’s why Hong Kongers took it to the street and the demonstration on 1st January 2013 opened a new chapter of Hong Kong’s continuous battle for freedom and universal suffrage.

I believe that every human being is born free. Before I go into the details of the demonstration, it’s important for me to talk about how freedoms in Hong Kong erode after the handover of sovereignty in 1997.

In the Sino-British Joint Declaration and the Basic Law stated clearly that Hong Kongers’ freedoms are protected:

Sino-British Joint Declaration

(5) The current social and economic systems in Hong Kong will remain unchanged, and so will the life-style. Rights and freedoms, including those of the person, of speech, of the press, of assembly, of association, of travel, of movement, of correspondence, of strike, of choice of occupation, of academic research and of religious belief will be ensured by law in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. Private property, ownership of enterprises, legitimate right of inheritance and foreign investment will be protected by law.

The Basic Law

Article 27
Hong Kong residents shall have freedom of speech, of the press and of publication; freedom of association, of assembly, of procession and of demonstration; and the right and freedom to form and join trade unions, and to strike.

Article 28
The freedom of the person of Hong Kong residents shall be inviolable.

No Hong Kong resident shall be subjected to arbitrary or unlawful arrest, detention or imprisonment. Arbitrary or unlawful search of the body of any resident or deprivation or restriction of the freedom of the person shall be prohibited. Torture of any resident or arbitrary or unlawful deprivation of the life of any resident shall be prohibited.

The truth is, the freedoms we enjoy in Hong Kong is gradually being taken away. Not ripped from us all at the same time, but bit by bit…

News reports (over the past years) are clear evidence of these. A few recent news reports are used below to outline what’s been going on in Hong Kong. You’d notice that only one publication is quoted – this is another evidence of the self-censorship amongst the Hong Kong media. Note: some other publications follow up with these reports, and a number of them are relatively unbiased whilst some completely ignore any of the above and continue supporting the Hong Kong SAR government and the China government.

Apple Daily (8th Jan, 2013) “Limiting access to records of registered companies, stops media from investigating and confirming identities – harms public interest”

Investigative journalism is important to a free nation, where people are informed the stories that matter to their livelihood.

Apple Daily (1st Aug, 2012) – Mr Paul CHAN Mo-po, Secretary for Development, was found to own sub-division flats under a company (sub-division flats are illegal in Hong Kong). In light of this scandal, the government stopped the public, including journalists, from obtaining drivers’ identity via going through records of licence plate number. (Mr. CHAN, who’s also recorded in camera for drink driving, is free from any prosecution and charges Apple Daily (4th Oct, 2012))

Apple Daily (13th Dec 2012) – End of 2012, Apple Daily also exposed a massive scandal about “ditch oil” (basically “processed” used oil that’s dumped by restaurants (some even “collect” it from the drains, hence the name), it’s proven to be cancer causing and China has been producing and selling within China for years). The story revealed that a China company has been selling ditch oil to at least one Hong Kong distributor and many restaurant chains have been using such oil. This China company is owned by a State-Owned-Enterprise, which emerged in recent years and already became one of the largest (cooking) oil companies in the PRC.

When the newspaper further investigated the matter in China, the journalists were taken to the police in China and threatened they will not be welcome to China if they report the story. One of the China journalists who first uncovered the ditch oil in the first place was found dead with multiple stab wounds soon after the news was published. The ditch oil business is believed to be owned by the powerful.

Censorship in Hong Kong is not done by the government nor in the form of active involvement. With the number of newspaper in Hong Kong, only one or maybe two would report government’s inadequacy or scandals related to local government officials as well as the government in China.

I’ll follow with another piece about the 1st Jan 2013 demonstration, and media in Hong Kong once again were clearly categorised into two groups: pro-China (the majority) and pro-democracy (minority).

Please leave your comments.