National Education Centre Asks Schools for Endorsement

Following on my previous post about National and Moral Education Curriculum, despite the fact that the Curriculum is quietly embedded in various subjects, the National Education Centre continues to work on establishing a new subject for students in Hong Kong in order to further brainwash children.

SupportNationalEducationAbove picture obtained from House News, for original article in Cantonese/Chinese, please refer to here.

The National Education Centre issued letters to all schools in Hong Kong, which provides a simple letter that says:

Dear Sir/Madam,

Since the National Education Centre always strives to promote national education and national quality education, I am happy to support the Centre to continue servicing the education sector and its continuous operation.

Best regards,

____________

Cheung Yui-Fai, a liberal studies teacher, posted the letter onto the Facebook page of National Education Parents’ Concern Group. As a committee member of the Hong Kong Professional Teachers’ Union, Cheung questioned the agenda behind the Centre’s letter – does this mean the biased National Education Curriculum is returning in full form (base on the “coincident” of the HKSAR government’s mentioned National Education in its Human Rights report which was submitted to the United Nation recently).

Cheung also added that the Centre has not done anything ever since the people won the “war” which forced the HKSAR government to “shelved” the curriculum.

On the second page of the letter issued by the Centre, a survey asked the schools if they have participate any of the activities organised by the Centre and what recommendations they have for the activities.

In the Human Rights report submitted to the United Nation, Chapter 2.21, says “This new initiative is expected to be implemented in the 2013/14 school year to further enhance the elements of national education”, and completely omitted the fact that the HKSAR government has announced the curriculum is shelved in September 2012.

2012 Report to Congress U.S.-CHINA ECONOMIC AND SECURITY REVIEW COMMISSION

I bumped into a Cantonese blog yesterday, and think this is a minor positive progress.

Approximately 30 pages in the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission Report are reporting on Hong Kong, a few key points are highlighted below:

1. Pro-Beijing parties enjoyed a financial advantage over their rivals, which enabled them to build extensive logistical networks to mobilize voters and exploit Hong Kong’s electoral peculiarities. (p.267)

2. Babies born in the territory enjoy the privileges of Hong Kong citizenship: access to the city’s superior health and education systems, and greater freedom to travel and settle inside and outside China.(p.267)

3. So-called ‘‘birth-tourism’’ quickly became a hot-button issue, with some going so far as to depict mainland Chinese as ‘‘locusts.’(p.268)

4. Censorship controversies at the South China Morning Post, one of Hong Kong’s most prominent newspapers, increased following the appointment of Wang Xingwei as editor-in-chief in January 2012. Mr. Wang, a former China Daily reporter, concurrently serves as a member of Jilin Province’s Political Consultative Conference, 424 a Chinese Communist Party-selected and -controlled organization. In June, he was accused of censoring coverage of the death of Li Wangyang, a well-known Chinese dissident. (p.270)

5. The city’s public schools were going to be required to begin teach- ing a course in ‘‘moral and national education’’ by 2015, which some called a thinly veiled ‘‘brainwashing’’ effort evocative of the Cultural Revolution.(p.272)

6. Beijing’s increasing influence in Hong Kong’s affairs calls into question the security of advanced technology products exported from the United States to Hong Kong.(p.273)

7. Congress reauthorize Section 301 of the U.S.-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992, which requires the U.S. secretary of State to submit an annual report to Congress on political, economic, and social developments in Hong Kong of relevance to the United States. This should include reporting on mainland interference in Hong Kong’s internal political affairs and Chinese efforts to leverage the territory as a platform for the internationalization of the RMB.(p.274)

8. Congress review the U.S.-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992 to deter- mine its continued applicability. In particular, Congress should review the security of advanced technology products exported from the United States to Hong Kong.(p.274)

9. Members of Congress, when visiting mainland China, also visit Hong Kong and that Congress encourage senior administration officials, including the secretary of State, to make visits to Hong Kong part of their travel.(p.274)

Glad to know that the US is monitoring Hong Kong closely, and I hope the US will actually react and stop the PRC from further interfering Hong Kong’s autonomy, and gradually Hong Kong can go independent!

Hong Kong’s unique history (and a bit of China)

To talk about Hong Kong history, we need to trace it quite a while back. Below is my attempt to make it as short and simple as possible…

China has always been a “multi-ethnicity country”. Han has traditionally be the ruler of China (of course the other “countries” in China are ruled by various ethnic leaders) – this is a very complicated subject, and this English website and this Chinese page show the map of China in all dynasty in history.

Now let’s look Ming and Qing.

Wu San-kuei (or Wu Sangui), a military general of the Ming empire was the direct cause of the fall of the Ming dynasty. Based on history, his obsession over his concubine, Chen YuanYuan, was the fundamental reason that he betrayed the Ming emperor.

Long story short, Wu opened the gate for the Qing army, resulting the end of Ming. Great Qing (大清), the last imperial dynasty of China, was established in 1644 by Manchu people.

Qing enjoyed a long period of prosperity, and the reigns of the Yongzheng Emperor (r. 1723–1735) and his son, the Qianlong Emperor (r. 1735–1796), marked the height of the Qing Dynasty’s power. During this period, the Qing Empire ruled over 13 million square kilometres of territory. However, towards the end of the Qing dynasty, the corruption and general addiction to opium caused enormous problem to China. The long-term weakness led Qing dynasty to an end.

During the Opium Wars, the Qing government signed multiple treaties with the western world – China calls these treaties “unequal treaties” till this very day (a personal note: I agree that there’s nothing for the western world to be proud of, but I cannot agree that these treaties are unfair. Let me quote a Chinese saying 勝者為王,敗者為寇 – basically it means: the winner is the champion and the loser only has oneself to blame.)

The Treaty of Nanking, signed on 29 August 1842, The Qing government agreed to make Hong Kong Island a crown colony, ceding it to the British Queen “in perpetuity”. In 1860, the colony was extended with the Kowloon peninsula. In 1898, the Second Convention of Peking further expanded the colony with the 99 year lease of the New Territories.

A couple interesting facts:

  • When the western army went to China, people in Hong Kong provided food, water and many other supplies to the westerners
  • Many Han Chinese, according to other materials, supported the western troops

More to follow, this is only to explain the colony status of Hong Kong, and I’ll write more about what happened in more recent history…

Thanks for reading. Please leave comments.

 

Populism in Hong Kong

Populism has been viewed as a political ideology, political philosophy, or as a type of discourse. Generally, populists tend to claim that they side with “the people” against “the elites”. While for much of the twentieth century, populism was considered to be a political phenomenon mostly affecting Latin America, since the 1980s populist movements and parties have enjoyed degrees of success in First World democracies such as the USA, Canada, Italy, the Netherlands and Scandinavian countries.
(Source: Wikipedia)

Populism has become a popular topic in recent days in Hong Kong. Some, particularly the pro-China people, are asking (or accusing?) why Hong Kong people have become populists.

This is not hard to imagine, if you follow the news in Hong Kong.

When the discussion of the transfer of sovereignty to the PRC began in 1980s, Hong Kong people were terrified of the Community PRC. Hence, the massive amount of Hong Kongers emigrating to foreign countries to live a life as a second grade citizen. (More to discuss about the transfer of sovereignty – there are reasons why I didn’t use the term “handover”)

After 15 years under the PRC’s rein (yes, supposed to be 1-country-2-system, but it’s fabricated), the changes in Hong Kong are so substantial that people become more and more edgy (Hong Kong people have always come across as “tamed” and politically ignorant). Here are a few major examples:

  • Article 23 (2003): despite the fact that Hong Kongers have expressed their view repeatedly. The Hong Kong SAR government insisted that the majority of people in Hong Kong wants this to be a legislation. Regina Ip, then Secretary for Security, as well as the HKSAR government, were determined to push the bill forward. Over 500,000 people went on the street to protest against the bill. Under enormous pressure, the government back-down.
  • Copyright Amendment Bill (2011): parody is something that many enjoy. This does not only help nurturing creativity, in fact has proven to help the popularity of the original creation (recent example: PSY Gangnam Style)
  • Anti-Moral-and-National-Education-Curriculum (2012): the introduction of the Moral and National Education Curriculum in 2012 is another major issue that caused

(I didn’t know where to start, just only picked a few examples)

Recently, former senior PRC government officers made various statements condemning Hong Kong people for seeking independence, including this one:

  • Lu Ping, former director of the State Council’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, stated in an exchange of email with the South China Morning Post “Our country, which has a population of 1.3 billion, would not be bothered losing this handful of people.”

Lu said in recent months that Hong Kong would have been a “dead city” if it wasn’t for China and he threatened to stop supply of Dongjiang water (one of my previous post explained this is complete nonsense).

A so called motherland, threatened its own people to stopped water supply (disregarding the fact that this isn’t really the case, Hong Kong pays money for the extremely low quality water, making it a transaction not a merciful act), even said that it doesn’t matter to them to have 7million less people (implying lives aren’t important)…  No wonder this country allows torture, illegitimate killings, house arrest for no ground, and even orders to kill so to harvest human organs!

The death of Hong Kong is fast approaching

The Court of Final Appeal permanent judge Kemal Bokhary expressed his views on the gloomy outlook of Hong Kong’s legal system.

News article in The Standard

South China Morning Post news report

i-Cable (a local TV channel) where you can listen to Judge Bokhary’s interview in English

The independent legal system in Hong Kong is one of our core values. Hong Kong’s legal system is being challenged, and proved by what Elsie Leung Oi-sie, Secretary for Justice of Hong Kong from 1997 to 2005, and was a member of the Executive Council of Hong Kong, said recently. She criticised the legal professionals in Hong Kong that they “have a poor understanding of and misunderstood the China central government-HKSAR relationship”. She was also reported to have said that if the judges had the correct and necessary understanding, mistakes would not have been made.

Despite the fact that the China central government has the right to (as written in the Basic Law), Hong Kong has the right to amend Basic Law. The crucial part of this debate is that “why would Hong Kong rely on China’s interpretation of law rather than doing the job itself”? After all, according to the Sino-British Joint Declaration, Hong Kong enjoys a high degree of autonomy, except in foreign and defence affairs which are the responsibilities of the Central People’s Government.

I will write more on this in coming days.

Reasons for starting my blog…

Perhaps, our world has changed. Blogging has become something that people can share not only about their lives but something that can influence others! I bet not many thought of it when blog was first “invented”.

Years ago, when I was a student, I was introduced to the new world called “Blog”. Tried to write a blog about what’s going on in “my life” every now and then, but that lasted for about a month. My friends said, “you need to write about something that you’re passionate about, or you’ll simply lose interest!” I guess that’s true, but what do I feel passionate about?

Unlike some fortunate people who can study abroad, I was born in Hong Kong and live in this lovely humble land ever since. Now when I come to think about it, it probably was a blessing in disguise!

Hong Kong was a British colony for well over a century. People enjoyed a great degree of freedom despite there was no democracy (didn’t get to elect our governors). Ever since the transfer of sovereignty in 1997, things change and often decline so quickly that when I walk down the street I find my home a strange place…

Now, I’ve found something that I want to blog about. Something that I’m truly passionate about… My home – Hong Kong. By living in this wonderful place for all these years, I have come to realise that nothing can hurt me more than what people are doing to my home (this affects my families too!).

The more I read, the more I realise – Hong Kong is becoming a place that the PRC government is determined to ruin, and strategically invading Hong Kong and turning it into the PRC’s colony

The world seems to think that Hong Kong is doing just fine (even the Consul-General in Hong Kong reported back to the UK that 1-country-2-system is working perfectly well!!!!). This blog is somewhere for me to vent my frustrations, but more importantly a platform for Hong Kong to be seen by the international world from a different prospective, or more accurately, revealing what the truths are underneath a peaceful and harmonious veil created by those in power.

(This little hope I have is exactly why, I’m writing in English not in my mother tongue Cantonese)