Discrimination – a term being abused in HK and the importance of safeguarding Cantonese

Language is a key to not only civilisation, but also racial identity. It somehow put restrictions on the way you think.

As many know, Cantonese (UN recongised it as a language a while back) and English are the two official languages in Hong Kong. The majority of us speak both, mostly Cantonese in daily use. An interesting thing is, many Cantonese words used in Hong Kong (some in China use Cantonese, mainly in Guangdong) is derived directly from English. We also very often incorporate English words in our conversations too. Taxi drivers in Hong Kong can often speak a bit of English despite most of them have received very limited education.

So, as a newbie in Hong Kong, one would certainly be prepared to learn Cantonese – may not be fluent, but you should at least respect the local languages here.

If you are prepared to go to a local school, you will expect to be taught in Cantonese and English. That requires no explanation nor does it constitute any sort of discrimination.

Below are two clips with English subtitle:

Do you honestly think that using Cantonese for interviewing kindergartens in Hong Kong can be seen as discrimination? In universities, English is typically the language being used in lectures. Some courses, however, use Cantonese due to what is being taught at the course. If one choose to take up the Cantonese language lecture (there’s a Mandarin one, because there are too many Chinese studying in HK), could you blame the lecturer for using Cantonese as the medium of instruction? What I don’t understand is why did the university provide a Mandarin lecture specifically for Chinese students? It’s like an international student from France who study in the UK and he/she would naturally expect all lectures to be taught in English.

Discrimination is being used so very often in Hong Kong, particularly by the Chinese students and new immigrants. The thing is, many of the immigrants from China back in the days (early 40s to 60s), they only spoke their own dialects. They did, however, tried very hard to fit in and because they know if they didn’t fit in and learn the language, they would not be able to live in Hong Kong and find a job. This is simply logic. My parents, for example, were not aboriginal Hong Kongers. They also emigrated to Hong Kong decades ago (to flee from the Communists, of course). They never expected to not speak Cantonese and be able to survive in Hong Kong.

By having more and more Chinese immigrants who refuse to speak our language, Hong Kongers will become the minority and Cantonese will soon be lost. A language with thousands of years of history, yet has been modified over all these years. Cantonese in Hong Kong, in particular, changes rapidly – mainly due to the influence of British English and the colonial time.

One thing you’re probably not aware of if you do not read and write Cantonese, there are increasing number of terminologies have been changed into the Mandarin version, and are broadcast via TV channels (news and drama), radio channels, as well as newspapers. People are not aware of them if they’re not careful – 打造, for example, literally means “hit make”, is a term that’s been widely used in China. It is a newly created term to replace many words in Chinese languages, including ” 建造 (construct)”, “建設(build)”, “創造(create)”, etc.

This is a subtle change, but day by day, this kind of changes in use of word, replacement of terms will have tremendous impact to a race. Below is an abstract from the book 1984:

“It’s a beautiful thing, the Destruction of words. Of course the great wastage is in the verbs and adjectives, but there are hundreds of nouns that can be got rid of as well. It isn’t only the synonyms; there are also the antonyms. After all, what justification is there for a word, which is simply the opposite of some other word? A word contains its opposite in itself. Take ‘good,’ for instance. If you have a word like ‘good,’ what need is there for a word like ‘bad’? ‘Ungood’ will do just as well – better, because it’s an exact opposite, which the other is not. Or again, if you want a stronger version of ‘good,’ what sense is there in having a whole string of vague useless words like ‘excellent’ and ‘splendid’ and all the rest of them? ‘Plusgood’ covers the meaning or ‘doubleplusgood’ if you want something stronger still. Of course we use those forms already, but in the final version of Newspeak there’ll be nothing else. In the end the whole notion of goodness and badness will be covered by only six words – in reality, only one word. Don’t you see the beauty of that, Winston? It was B.B.’s idea originally, of course,” he added as an afterthought. (1.5.23, Syme)

As I said up front, language in a way constructs the way we think…

“Don’t you see that the whole aim of Newspeak is to narrow the range of thought? In the end we shall make thoughtcrime literally impossible, because there will be no words in which to express it. Every concept that can ever be needed will be expressed by exactly one word, with its meaning rigidly defined and all its subsidiary meanings rubbed out and forgotten.” (1.5.23, Syme)

Just leave this to you to think…

Over and out!

One Cross-Boarder Marriage Brings A Whole Village of Chinese to Hong Kong

Hong Kong Autonomy Movement illustrated how ONE Hong Kong man’s cross-boarder marriage can “boost” Hong Kong’s population (new immigrants from China). Soon enough, there will be more Chinese than Hong Kongers in Hong Kong!

Thank them so much for all the details. Now let’s look at this TRUE STORY – Mr A lives in Tin Shui Wai

(1) Mr A is a Hong Kong citizen. After he married Ms B from China, she applied for a One-Way Permit using “family reunion” as her reason. She had to wait for a few years before she moved to Hong Kong. Ms B gave birth to a baby girl in China before she moved to Hong Kong. Mr A successfully applied for his wife and daughter to move to Hong Kong. Result: 1 HK citizen+ 2 Chinese

(2) Ms B divorced Mr A after she moved to Hong Kong and met Mr C who is not a Hong Kong citizen (and he’s from the same province in China of Ms B). Mr C is divorced for many years and has a son who was born in China. Ms B successfully applied for Mr C and his son to move to Hong Kong as she claimed that they are her dependents. Result: 1 HK (new) citizen (Ms B) + 2 Chinese (Mr C and his son)

(3) Years later, Ms B has been a Hong Kong permanent resident for years, she applied for her mother to move to Hong Kong. Since her mother is above 65 years old, she did not have to wait and can immigrate to Hong Kong immediately. Result: 1 HK (new) citizen (Ms B) + 1 Chinese (Ms B’s mother)

(4) After three One-Way permit applications, one Hong Kong citizen (Mr A) brings FIVE Chinese citizens to immigrate to Hong Kong – all because of one cross-boarder marriage. In addition to the above formula, Mr C, Mr C’s son and Ms B can also help their other relatives in China to apply for One-Way Permit in the names of family reunion. Mr C’s 65+ year-old parents (2 Chinese), Mr C’s son can apply his birth mother to move to Hong Kong after he is 18 years old (1 Chinese), Ms B’s mother can also apply her children to move to Hong Kong (as many as she pleases), and these children of hers can apply for their spouses and children to move to Hong Kong. And so on.

 

 

A simple formula: “marriage, divorce, re-marry” can bring in FIVE Chinese to Hong Kong as “new immigrants”. Hong Kong’s immigration policy is completely ridiculous! Once the new immigrants obtain their permanent residencies, they can apply for their relatives to move to Hong Kong for “family reunion”. Theoretically, there is no limit in terms of how many Chinese can move to Hong Kong. Hong Kong has essentially leave its front door WIDE OPEN for Chinese to move in as they please.

How about other countries in the world?

Japan: A foreign man marries a Japanese woman, he cannot apply for citizenship; if a foreign woman marries a Japanese man, she can apply for citizenship. However, when she is neutralised, her relatives cannot apply for Japan citizenship.

Singapore: Similar to Japan. Men cannot marry Singaporean women to obtain Singapore citizenship, this is to prevent people getting divorce and marry a local to get citizenship of the country.

Taiwan: After living in Taiwan for over 10 years plus other conditions are fulfilled, a Taiwan citizen can apply for their spouse to move to Taiwan. This spouse will be granted conditional temporary residency. If they divorce within a certain period of time, the conditional residency will be voided. A spouse of a Taiwan citizen cannot apply his/her relatives to move to Taiwan unless he/she has been living in Taiwan legally for over 10 years.

US: Citizens have to prove that they have been paying tax before they can apply their relatives to move to the US. If the applicants are elderly, they will not be able to enjoy social benefits at the beginning – the US citizen who applies an elderly to move to the US will have to bear all the expenses of the elderly. As for spouses of US citizens who move to the US, until they begin to pay tax, they will not be able to enjoy any social security or unemployment benefits. If one divorces their spouse who is a US citizen, he/she re-marry, he/she will have to pay tax for several years before applying for the spouse to move to the US. All to prevent any exploitation of the system.

 

Now let’s look at Macau and China:

Macau: a Macau permanent resident who wants to apply his/her spouse to move to Macau, the spouse has to live in Macau for seven years before obtaining permanent residency. If the spouse divorce the Macau permanent resident, his/her residency will be invalid immediately.

China: anyone from any nation marrying a Chinese citizen, he/she cannot obtain Chinese citizenship, including people from Hong Kong and Macau.

 

Now you can see the loophole, right? Some may say that applying relatives to move to the country one reside is basic human rights, but the system in Hong Kong is not comprehensive enough to make sure that there is a certain limitation to prevent people from exploiting it! Human rights is one thing, but a throughout population policy is also necessary. By simply revising the existing immigration law to seal the loophole or at least make it more difficult for people to exploit it, this massive uncontrollable influx of new immigrants from China can then be “relieved”.

“Zero quota for anchor baby” (as called by CY Leung) is useless unless immigration policy is amended.

Over and out!

 

HKU Discriminates HKers and Favours Chinese

Hong Kong University completed its Residential Colleges on Lung Wah Street. The allocation of dormitory is a blatant discrimination against Hong Kong students. HKU have long been saying that they will resolve the problem of a shortage of dormitory space, but what the university has done is the complete opposite. The new residential colleges do not only reserve less dormitory space for local students in Hong Kong, the police even put students from China in a separate category, which means when it comes to allocating dormitory space, there are THREE categories: Hong Kong students, international students, and China students, with an aimed allocation ratio of 1:1:1. This is basically offering privilege to China students who should logically be grouped as “international students” (given that their parents do not pay tax to Hong Kong which is only fair that they are not eligible for the education that is funded by the Hong Kong SAR government at the same price as the local students). To make this worse, the university plans to reserve 50% of the dormitory space for post-graduate students: please bear in mind that 50% of post-graduate students in Hong Kong University are from China! HKU’s policies on dormitory allocation is complete and utterly biased and favours students from China and discriminate the local students!

It doesn’t end here! Hong Kong local students are NOT allowed to apply a space in this dormitory, but non-locals can.

Local university students in Hong Kong are clearly not the priorities to the local universities. Those who keep saying that those who are qualified to student their Masters and PhD, no matter where they come from should be allowed to study in Hong Kong. Hey, as far as I know, US and UK have policies to make sure that the locals get priorities – for example, international students have to secure better grades than the locals if they intend to study in the same university, international students have to pay substantially more tuition fees than the locals. This is not the same in Hong Kong!

One thing you need to know, students from China can stay in Hong Kong, after seven years, they can become Hong Kong citizens and get HKSAR passports yet still hold their China passports – people from any other countries can’t become HK citizens unless you go through the neutralisation process.

Sending the massive amount of immigrants isn’t quite enough. It’s not fast enough. By the time a “democratic election” is held (if China really want to prevent Occupy Central from happening, they’d better act quick), China needs to make sure that there will be a majority number of “Hong Kongers” who will “elect” the candidate they want to govern Hong Kong. Colonisation is already a nice way of describing what China’s doing to Hong Kong.

Playing the colonisation game, China’s the best! Look at Tibet! It’s in fact ethnic cleansing!

Only because we share similar complexion and hair colour with Chinese, doesn’t mean Hong Kongers are Chinese. Chinese always use this superficial and naive way of differentiating different races. In fact, they try to blur the difference between ethnicity and national, and often tell Hongkies off for not “agreeing” that we are Chinese. Well, again, they should really go tell Japanese and Korean that they are Chinese too!

Over and out!

Billy, a Protester got Arrested but Released TWICE

Billy Chiu, an activist who’s participated in various rallies, was arrested on 4/Aug during a rally to support freedom of speech and against suppression imposed by the CCP and HKSAR government.

The reason? A police officer claimed that Billy tried to snatch his gun!

I wonder if the police did actually feel Billy’s hand touching his gun or was that all a bit of a made up story – because he was RELEASE unconditionally and the police simply said it was just a misunderstanding… What they accused Billy of doing was pretty serious crime, shouldn’t they have handled it more carefully – i.e. at least to have clear evidence? The police officer had his hand covering his gun… Exactly how was that possible? Also, was it really necessary to have eight policemen to move a skinny young lad?

Billy met his misfortune once again yesterday (18/Aug). This time round he was arrested for “disorder in public places” after he shouted “Hong Kong is my country”. Again, he was released unconditionally the same evening because the police hasn’t got sufficient evidence.

Many believe that the police is trying to set an example. Billy is an easy target – let’s face it, he doesn’t have the “good boy” face, and he was caught in cameras repeatedly for shouting out loud, and what’s more: he’s young and pro-HK independence.

I’m sure you know that Anti-Secession Law is very strict in China, a random blog post could be sufficient enough for years of imprisonment. But thankfully, after 500,000 people took it to the street in 2003, Article 23 didn’t go through in Hong Kong.

Imagine if Article 23 goes ahead (it is believed that pushing for Article 23 is one of CY Leung’s political missions alongside of National Education), this chap could be sentenced for life!

Treasure our freedoms, and continue to fight for what we want. Why is it a crime to demand democracy? If democracy doesn’t fit China’s taste, let us be. Leave us alone. Why is China so obsessed with the “unification of Greater China”? Taiwan is an independent country, there’s no doubt about it. Why can’t they simply stop harassing yellow skin and black hair folks?

The world, be warned. China’s expansionism isn’t going to stop until it conquer the world. Look at the number of Chinese immigrating to every countries in the world! They want to be the only power in the world, their ambition is so clear. Why isn’t any of the world leaders aware of it? Why isn’t any of them doing something about it? Kowtowing to China will not warrant you safety, but it’s like a famous ancient saying from The Six Nations Theory “…bringing firewood to extinguish fire. Unless all firewood is burnt out, the fire will not die”. What the world is doing is dangerous, do not be fooled by the Chinese.

Over and out.

Attack on Titan/ Attack on China?

Attack on Titan is a Japanese comic series and recently made into anime. The series has gain substantial popularity in Hong Kong (as well as in Japan, I’d think).

Many in HK find the story line matches the situation in Hong Kong, hence they created the video below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ToGqN2M5NrY

Cantonese lyrics with English subtitle.

Enjoy.

Over and out

China FA: HK Footballer is a Foreigner

One interesting news in today’s Apple Daily (19/July):

Yapp Hung Fai is the goalie of Hong Kong’s First Division League club South China. Guizhou Renhe Football Club, a China Super League club, offered Yapp a 5 years contract and he’s supposed to join the club end of June.

There are some recent personnel changes in the China Football Association and quoted some sort of regulations that say China football teams cannot hire goalkeepers from Hong Kong and Macau, and refused to allow Yapp, a “foreign nationality” to join Guizhou Renhe.

So, even China comes out to admit that they don’t see Hong Kongers as its own people! This makes me smile – they keep banging on about how “blood is thicker than water” when there are earthquakes or floods, they keep banging on about Hong Kongers should tolerate their barbarian behaviours (defecating in the middle of the street and on the train, for example) because “Hong Kongers are Chinese too”.

Hong Kongers ARE NOT China citizens. For those who own HKSAR passport, you are free to travel to China, but you’ll never be a citizen of China, that is, you can’t get a China passport. So much of “one big family”! What a load of crap.

If you trust the Chinese (again, Chinese in China, not referring to ethnicity), it will cost you!

Over and out

National Education Centre Asks Schools for Endorsement

Following on my previous post about National and Moral Education Curriculum, despite the fact that the Curriculum is quietly embedded in various subjects, the National Education Centre continues to work on establishing a new subject for students in Hong Kong in order to further brainwash children.

SupportNationalEducationAbove picture obtained from House News, for original article in Cantonese/Chinese, please refer to here.

The National Education Centre issued letters to all schools in Hong Kong, which provides a simple letter that says:

Dear Sir/Madam,

Since the National Education Centre always strives to promote national education and national quality education, I am happy to support the Centre to continue servicing the education sector and its continuous operation.

Best regards,

____________

Cheung Yui-Fai, a liberal studies teacher, posted the letter onto the Facebook page of National Education Parents’ Concern Group. As a committee member of the Hong Kong Professional Teachers’ Union, Cheung questioned the agenda behind the Centre’s letter – does this mean the biased National Education Curriculum is returning in full form (base on the “coincident” of the HKSAR government’s mentioned National Education in its Human Rights report which was submitted to the United Nation recently).

Cheung also added that the Centre has not done anything ever since the people won the “war” which forced the HKSAR government to “shelved” the curriculum.

On the second page of the letter issued by the Centre, a survey asked the schools if they have participate any of the activities organised by the Centre and what recommendations they have for the activities.

In the Human Rights report submitted to the United Nation, Chapter 2.21, says “This new initiative is expected to be implemented in the 2013/14 school year to further enhance the elements of national education”, and completely omitted the fact that the HKSAR government has announced the curriculum is shelved in September 2012.