20/Oct Demonstration – Justice for HKTV Hijacked by Pseudo Lift-wingers

The police in Hong Kong said there were 20,000 took it to the street yesterday, but being there from the early time (skipped the rally, but went straight to the Government Headquarter) to observe the flow, I am pretty sure that the number was closer to 80,000 or even 120,000.

Why did people take it to the street? According to BBC: “Thousands of people have taken to the streets of Hong Kong to protest against what they see as a lack of government transparency and accountability”. My attention was drawn to two words in this sentence “they see” – It’s either the journalist failed to investigate into the core of the issue, or they simply cannot be asked to report about Hong Kong properly. If that’s the case, do us all Hong Konger a favour, don’t report at all.

There’s a trend here, since the handover of sovereignty:

  • The HKSAR government dropped all charges against Sally Aw claiming that her prosecution involves “major public interest” and didn’t give any further explanation
  • Timothy Tong’s case is still lingering after all the evidence has been pulled out
  • The government continues to allow ATV to operate despite major scandals and horrendious quality of TV production (e.g. reporting a false exclusive story on Jiang Zemin’s death, producing close to zero programmes but repeatedly broadcasting the same shows over and over again for years)

Exactly why ATV still holds one of the two free-to-air TV channel licenses is beyond believe. Bear in mind the fact that HKTV only applied for an free-to-air TV license that does not take up any of the public air wave, meaning that even if HKTV can get the license, people won’t be able to watch any of the programmes without a decoder box.

The Executive Council refused to disclose details about the evaluation and claimed that it’s all confidential. When public interest is involved, the government has the obligation to disclose details to ensure that the fairness and transparency of the evaluation is understood. If there is nothing to hide, of course!

Reports have been leaked, and all pointing to the fact that the recommendation made by independent consultant(s) and Executive Council’s original proposal was to issue licenses to all three applicants, including HKTV. Why the sudden change of tune? Why only iCable and PCCW, two telecommunications giants that have pretty much dominated the industry for years, are granted the licenses?

Ricky Wong, HKTV’s founder, years ago founded CTI which basically targeted the telecommunications industry and forced the then monopoly, PCCW, to engage in a price war – introducing competition in the market and bring the service prices of  internet and international direct dial (IDD) down dramatically. We used to pay US$2 a minute for IDD back then if not more. Now, we can spend no more than US$0.1 a minute!

Combining the fact that Li Ka-shing, the ultimate owner of PCCW, had been saying to the market that he’s going to sell off a couple local businesses, including ParkNShop, which triggered the market’s nerves – IS LI KA-SHING RETREATING FROM HONG KONG?

Coincidentally, Li announced that he’s not selling ParkNShop after all, soon after the license was granted to PCCW.

This is only one conspiracy theory, but I believe there’s a lot more behind – the China government has no doubt be involved in the TV license matter. Why would China, which has been suppressing the language and the free thoughts of Hong Kongers, be happy to see a TV channel that only service the people of Hong Kong? Soft power can easily be created once again if Hong Kong’s TV drama became internationally recognised – back in the 70s and 80s, Hong Kong movies, TV series and songs were known to our neighbourhood countries (Japan, Malaysia, Korea, etc) as well as the Western countries. This has long gone.

Once again, I cannot help but start to feel the creepiness of this all – about how a tyrannical regime controls the people by altering the language and making it impossible for the people to think…

Mind you, as long as the Chinese government continue this global brainwashing programme, the free thinkers in the world will cease to exist… Doesn’t take too long, a couple of generations, all people fought for and democracy and freedoms that you and I cherish will perish.

I’m not sure if you’ve experienced a demonstration or a rally in Hong Kong. The script is pre-set, and that’s exactly why we still haven’t achieved anything from all these festival and weekend parades:

First people walk from Victoria Park or thereabout, then arrive at the Government Headquarter or China-Hong Kong Liaison Office, then shout slogans a little, then start singing songs (same old songs every year, including “Do you hear the people sing”, I kid you not), then the organiser would announce “Our voice has been heard. We’ve achieved interim progress. We shall continue to fight, but now that we should all rest before the next round of protest.”

There organisers are the pseudo lift-wingers (I’d try to write a bit more about this), that the Hong Kongers called them “left plastic”. “Plastic” in Cantonese is “Gaau1”, and it sounds just like 鳩 (Gau1), a rude word that refers to penis, but most often used to refer stupid, dumb and useless gits. So instead of “swearing”, we often call someone “plastic” if he/she does something dumb – the full term, in case you’re interested, is “Ngaang6 Gau1”, which literally means “hard plastic”.

Here’s the emotion icon for of calling someone “hard plastic”, widely used in Golden Forum, and can simply be replaced by this one :o)

So these “left plastics” aim at essentially achieving nothing – in any society with 100,000 people participating in a demonstration, it can essentially overthrow a government. Not in Hong Kong! These left plastics aim at raising money for themselves (obviously) and most importantly “raising their own profile” and created the illusion that they represent the people of Hong Kong, and the proxy of all social movements.

At the demonstration yesterday (20 Oct 2013), however, when two of these left plastics (they are new faces, as the public resentment against the well known left plastics grows) hijacked the stage of the HKTV staff (started encouraging people to leave the government HQ and proposed their “plans” as if they are in charge of the movement), someone went up to the stage and tell them to stand down and give the stage back to HKTV which should be in charge. This brave man has done a good job by telling them off, and was supported by many. There was a little incident happened at the same time that NO MEDIA reported – another young man went up to the stage and waved the pre-97 Hong Kong flag (with the union jack at the corner), and shouted “Hong Kong should declare independence!”.

Of course he was arrested#, but I wonder what happened to him?

Over and out

# Sorry, thanks to a reader’s comment, this chap was taken off stage, not arrested. Please see comment of this blog post

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Discrimination – a term being abused in HK and the importance of safeguarding Cantonese

Language is a key to not only civilisation, but also racial identity. It somehow put restrictions on the way you think.

As many know, Cantonese (UN recongised it as a language a while back) and English are the two official languages in Hong Kong. The majority of us speak both, mostly Cantonese in daily use. An interesting thing is, many Cantonese words used in Hong Kong (some in China use Cantonese, mainly in Guangdong) is derived directly from English. We also very often incorporate English words in our conversations too. Taxi drivers in Hong Kong can often speak a bit of English despite most of them have received very limited education.

So, as a newbie in Hong Kong, one would certainly be prepared to learn Cantonese – may not be fluent, but you should at least respect the local languages here.

If you are prepared to go to a local school, you will expect to be taught in Cantonese and English. That requires no explanation nor does it constitute any sort of discrimination.

Below are two clips with English subtitle:

Do you honestly think that using Cantonese for interviewing kindergartens in Hong Kong can be seen as discrimination? In universities, English is typically the language being used in lectures. Some courses, however, use Cantonese due to what is being taught at the course. If one choose to take up the Cantonese language lecture (there’s a Mandarin one, because there are too many Chinese studying in HK), could you blame the lecturer for using Cantonese as the medium of instruction? What I don’t understand is why did the university provide a Mandarin lecture specifically for Chinese students? It’s like an international student from France who study in the UK and he/she would naturally expect all lectures to be taught in English.

Discrimination is being used so very often in Hong Kong, particularly by the Chinese students and new immigrants. The thing is, many of the immigrants from China back in the days (early 40s to 60s), they only spoke their own dialects. They did, however, tried very hard to fit in and because they know if they didn’t fit in and learn the language, they would not be able to live in Hong Kong and find a job. This is simply logic. My parents, for example, were not aboriginal Hong Kongers. They also emigrated to Hong Kong decades ago (to flee from the Communists, of course). They never expected to not speak Cantonese and be able to survive in Hong Kong.

By having more and more Chinese immigrants who refuse to speak our language, Hong Kongers will become the minority and Cantonese will soon be lost. A language with thousands of years of history, yet has been modified over all these years. Cantonese in Hong Kong, in particular, changes rapidly – mainly due to the influence of British English and the colonial time.

One thing you’re probably not aware of if you do not read and write Cantonese, there are increasing number of terminologies have been changed into the Mandarin version, and are broadcast via TV channels (news and drama), radio channels, as well as newspapers. People are not aware of them if they’re not careful – 打造, for example, literally means “hit make”, is a term that’s been widely used in China. It is a newly created term to replace many words in Chinese languages, including ” 建造 (construct)”, “建設(build)”, “創造(create)”, etc.

This is a subtle change, but day by day, this kind of changes in use of word, replacement of terms will have tremendous impact to a race. Below is an abstract from the book 1984:

“It’s a beautiful thing, the Destruction of words. Of course the great wastage is in the verbs and adjectives, but there are hundreds of nouns that can be got rid of as well. It isn’t only the synonyms; there are also the antonyms. After all, what justification is there for a word, which is simply the opposite of some other word? A word contains its opposite in itself. Take ‘good,’ for instance. If you have a word like ‘good,’ what need is there for a word like ‘bad’? ‘Ungood’ will do just as well – better, because it’s an exact opposite, which the other is not. Or again, if you want a stronger version of ‘good,’ what sense is there in having a whole string of vague useless words like ‘excellent’ and ‘splendid’ and all the rest of them? ‘Plusgood’ covers the meaning or ‘doubleplusgood’ if you want something stronger still. Of course we use those forms already, but in the final version of Newspeak there’ll be nothing else. In the end the whole notion of goodness and badness will be covered by only six words – in reality, only one word. Don’t you see the beauty of that, Winston? It was B.B.’s idea originally, of course,” he added as an afterthought. (1.5.23, Syme)

As I said up front, language in a way constructs the way we think…

“Don’t you see that the whole aim of Newspeak is to narrow the range of thought? In the end we shall make thoughtcrime literally impossible, because there will be no words in which to express it. Every concept that can ever be needed will be expressed by exactly one word, with its meaning rigidly defined and all its subsidiary meanings rubbed out and forgotten.” (1.5.23, Syme)

Just leave this to you to think…

Over and out!

Calling folks from Virginia! I have bad news for you…

Calling folks from Virginia! You are being f—ed by (Mainland) Chinese! It’s only a metaphor! Sorry, please don’t get offended.

I’ve just finished reading an article, and it reminds me of something that I always want to tell people in Virginia state…

Translating names from western languages into Chinese languages is certainly very difficult. I dare say it’s an art! if you use one wrong character the meaning of the name is completely and instantly changed and can become a joke.

Do you know your state HAD a beautiful name in Cantonese? But do you know because of China’s invasion and expansionism, Virginia has become a cursed state? Let me tell you why…

Virginia is “translated” Cantonese as “維珍尼亞洲” – its Romanisation is “Wai4 Zan1 Nei4 Aa3 Zau1”, the meaning of each character:

維:maintain, preserve, safeguard

珍:precious, valuable, rare

尼:(originally) close, near; (derived meaning) Buddhist nun

亞:second, Asia

洲:state, continent

The “Cantonese translation” is very pretty when you pronounce it, and it kind of make Virginia a precious state based on the meaning. In fact, people often associate the characters above to beautiful things.

When we look at Mandarin version of Virginia, you will see this: 弗吉利亞 – in Mandarin, it’s Fu2, Ji2, Ni2, Ya4, Zhou1, here’s the meaning of each character:

弗:negative, not

吉:luck

The rest is the same as Cantonese’s.

Here’s the catch:

If you read the name in Mandarin “Fu Ji Nei” goes together is the same as “unlucky”. Fu sounds kind of like the F word to non-English speakers (maybe to English speakers too). The character 吉 share the same pronunciation as 㓤, which means poke… Now Virginia has become a virgin who gets f—ed and poked in Mandarin, it’s a bit nasty isn’t it?

Do you really still want to learn Mandarin because it’s the mother tongue of 1.3 billion people (if you’ve been to some remote provinces in China, you’d realise that Mandarin actually comes in SOOOOOO many different forms)? Please you need to ask yourself… How many people can speak English, both first or second language?

Over and out!

 

Erasing HK Race – First Start with Killing Cantonese

According to the Statistics Department, the percentage of Hong Kongers who can speak Mandarin went up from 25% in 1996 to 50% last year, but the percentage of Hong Kongers who can speak Cantonese (our official language and mother tongue) fell!

China’s invasion or colonisation plan is progressive yet in massive scale:

– Make sure that the people of Hong Kong feel (or fear) that without China, Hong Kong cannot survive

– Once this concept is embedded in the majority of the Hong Kongers (in fact the whole world), they can begin ordering the HKSAR government to “promote” the importance of Mandarin

– If you’ve read ancient Chinese poems, especially Tong poems, you’ll find that they rhyme a lot better if you read them out in Cantonese than Mandarin. Mandarin, is really not a Chinese language, it is the language that was modified based on Manchurian’s mother tongue in Qing. The Chinese back in those days for some reasons prefer to change their own language and appearance (having queue – aka men’s ponytail), and call it “Chinese” so that they don’t feel as bad (Hey! they’re Chinese too, they didn’t invade us, it’s just a change of emperor). Nowadays, Chinese language is taught in Mandarin in HK! Even the government’s website has changed – official languages used to be (as far as I remember) Cantonese and English, but now it says Chinese and English. This may not really mean anything to the non-Chinese speaking community (as they’d say “Cantonese is Chinese too!”), but Cantonese is a language (UN already recognised it!) and that HKers’ mother tongue really is Cantonese. It’s almost like British learning French back in the old days because it’s “the upper class” language (not that Mandarin is upper class by any means) – ridiculous! English is no longer being valued these days, because the whole world is evolving around China, according to China and the western world and of course the HKSAR government. Also, China sees every single British heritage (in fact anything that’s related to the post-handover time) is a disgrace to them, they have no intention for HKers to speak good English – they don’t care if HKers lose their competitiveness because HKers are never one of the Chinese in their eyes. The result is the appalling standard of English, particularly the younger generation.

– Erasing your language is only the beginning. You must have read about how great China is when it comes to censorship. There’s a book on Hong Kong history, the (traditional) Chinese version is being censored and a revised version was published and all the “non-censored” copies were recalled. Now that the English standard is low, the Chinese version available is censored, the Hong Kongers is prevented from reading the real history. Clever, hey?

Another thing I want to point out is that, there are 150 (yes, one hundred fifty) Chinese from across the boarder who can immigrate to Hong Kong EVERY DAY! After 16 years, there are approximately 870,000 Chinese who now call themselves Hong Kongers. Bear in mind, though, Hong Kongers cannot get a China citizenship nor the PRC passport. 870,000 is around 12% of Hong Kong’s current total population!

Imagine, say for example, you’re American…

You walk into your local grocery store, the shop owner and staff there all speak to you in Spanish and when you ask them to speak English, they were in awe.

When you tell foreigners who’re visiting America that you’re from America, and he/she response “Isn’t America part of Mexico?” When you explain that they are two separate country (alright, Hong Kong isn’t independent yet, but give it time), “But your country’s soil is connected to the Mexican soil!”

When your government tell you, Spanish is very important because the amount of trade and the increasing number of Mexican immigrants, you need to accommodate them so all American have to adapt Spanish as their main language.

How’s that make you feel?

To make it worse, you are a loyal countryman, and pay tax on time, never ask anything from government (social benefits, etc), and because of the influx of immigrants who have low (or no) skills, and cannot find job in your country. Your government spend your tax money to provide these foreigners everything they need: medical, education, social welfare, etc. while you are earning so little that you could just pay tax and live a everything bear minimum life (don’t even think about buying a flat)… You call for help and complain about exploitation, these immigrants turn around and tell you “you have to accommodate us, we share the same ethnicity! You should speak our language too because we are so important to your country” and then apply their entire family and sometimes folks from the entire village to move into your country and do exactly the same thing.

Imagine all these have been happening in your country for 16 year. At start this happened slowly but now your neighbouring country is speeding this process up.

You become the minority of your country, yet have to support the majority who invade your country! Shouldn’t you stand up and tell the world that this cannot go on? Even shut down the government and gain your rights back and protect your children from suffering even more server consequences that await them?

Over and out.

National Education Centre Asks Schools for Endorsement

Following on my previous post about National and Moral Education Curriculum, despite the fact that the Curriculum is quietly embedded in various subjects, the National Education Centre continues to work on establishing a new subject for students in Hong Kong in order to further brainwash children.

SupportNationalEducationAbove picture obtained from House News, for original article in Cantonese/Chinese, please refer to here.

The National Education Centre issued letters to all schools in Hong Kong, which provides a simple letter that says:

Dear Sir/Madam,

Since the National Education Centre always strives to promote national education and national quality education, I am happy to support the Centre to continue servicing the education sector and its continuous operation.

Best regards,

____________

Cheung Yui-Fai, a liberal studies teacher, posted the letter onto the Facebook page of National Education Parents’ Concern Group. As a committee member of the Hong Kong Professional Teachers’ Union, Cheung questioned the agenda behind the Centre’s letter – does this mean the biased National Education Curriculum is returning in full form (base on the “coincident” of the HKSAR government’s mentioned National Education in its Human Rights report which was submitted to the United Nation recently).

Cheung also added that the Centre has not done anything ever since the people won the “war” which forced the HKSAR government to “shelved” the curriculum.

On the second page of the letter issued by the Centre, a survey asked the schools if they have participate any of the activities organised by the Centre and what recommendations they have for the activities.

In the Human Rights report submitted to the United Nation, Chapter 2.21, says “This new initiative is expected to be implemented in the 2013/14 school year to further enhance the elements of national education”, and completely omitted the fact that the HKSAR government has announced the curriculum is shelved in September 2012.

Queen’s Road East – 90’s Canto-Pop

Queen’s Road East is a Canto-pop written in 1991, when Hong Kong’s future was determined by the British government and PRC government where Hong Kong people had absolutely no say. This song reflects the confusion of Hong Kongers and our fear for the Communist and PRC. If you watch the MTV carefully, you’d notice there are scenes of people and cars moving backward, a metaphor to symbolism that Hong Kong will go backward after the handover of sovereignty.

The lyrics is full of metaphor. Strongly illustrating Hong Kongers desperation and helplessness about our future.

Hope you’d enjoy the MTV and the lyrics translated below:

Queen’s Road West and Queen’s Road East
Queen’s Road East turns into Queen’s Road Central
Queen’s Road Central is crowded with people

Our royal friend is on the back of coins
Forever young and named the Queen
Follows me everywhere to do all sorts of trade
With an expressionless face that represents success

A dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
Where properties are available everywhere, people carry on buying and selling
But Mong Kok* may have to change its name

This rightful friend is familiar and friendly
Hence, allowing horses to race only twice a week
People, therefore, naturally compete to cross the finishing line
If you wish to be a citizens of the great nation, all it requires is money

Our dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
The hot and cold weather still affects this city
But we may have to seek help from people with supernatural power for a change of weather

Emptiness is form, form is emptiness**
Emptiness is form, form is emptiness…

This beautiful friend says goodbye in class
The same picture shown on TV every night
When the day of celebration comes, everyone has to applause
The respectable face on the back of coins turns into statues of martyrs

Our dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
The railways, buses and taxis will run all the same
But one may not know the routes anymore

* Mong Kok is a famous district with lots of hawker stalls, but have changed massively because of the influx of PRC Chinese tourists

** A famous Buddhist quote