National Education Centre Asks Schools for Endorsement

Following on my previous post about National and Moral Education Curriculum, despite the fact that the Curriculum is quietly embedded in various subjects, the National Education Centre continues to work on establishing a new subject for students in Hong Kong in order to further brainwash children.

SupportNationalEducationAbove picture obtained from House News, for original article in Cantonese/Chinese, please refer to here.

The National Education Centre issued letters to all schools in Hong Kong, which provides a simple letter that says:

Dear Sir/Madam,

Since the National Education Centre always strives to promote national education and national quality education, I am happy to support the Centre to continue servicing the education sector and its continuous operation.

Best regards,

____________

Cheung Yui-Fai, a liberal studies teacher, posted the letter onto the Facebook page of National Education Parents’ Concern Group. As a committee member of the Hong Kong Professional Teachers’ Union, Cheung questioned the agenda behind the Centre’s letter – does this mean the biased National Education Curriculum is returning in full form (base on the “coincident” of the HKSAR government’s mentioned National Education in its Human Rights report which was submitted to the United Nation recently).

Cheung also added that the Centre has not done anything ever since the people won the “war” which forced the HKSAR government to “shelved” the curriculum.

On the second page of the letter issued by the Centre, a survey asked the schools if they have participate any of the activities organised by the Centre and what recommendations they have for the activities.

In the Human Rights report submitted to the United Nation, Chapter 2.21, says “This new initiative is expected to be implemented in the 2013/14 school year to further enhance the elements of national education”, and completely omitted the fact that the HKSAR government has announced the curriculum is shelved in September 2012.

Queen’s Road East – 90’s Canto-Pop

Queen’s Road East is a Canto-pop written in 1991, when Hong Kong’s future was determined by the British government and PRC government where Hong Kong people had absolutely no say. This song reflects the confusion of Hong Kongers and our fear for the Communist and PRC. If you watch the MTV carefully, you’d notice there are scenes of people and cars moving backward, a metaphor to symbolism that Hong Kong will go backward after the handover of sovereignty.

The lyrics is full of metaphor. Strongly illustrating Hong Kongers desperation and helplessness about our future.

Hope you’d enjoy the MTV and the lyrics translated below:

Queen’s Road West and Queen’s Road East
Queen’s Road East turns into Queen’s Road Central
Queen’s Road Central is crowded with people

Our royal friend is on the back of coins
Forever young and named the Queen
Follows me everywhere to do all sorts of trade
With an expressionless face that represents success

A dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
Where properties are available everywhere, people carry on buying and selling
But Mong Kok* may have to change its name

This rightful friend is familiar and friendly
Hence, allowing horses to race only twice a week
People, therefore, naturally compete to cross the finishing line
If you wish to be a citizens of the great nation, all it requires is money

Our dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
The hot and cold weather still affects this city
But we may have to seek help from people with supernatural power for a change of weather

Emptiness is form, form is emptiness**
Emptiness is form, form is emptiness…

This beautiful friend says goodbye in class
The same picture shown on TV every night
When the day of celebration comes, everyone has to applause
The respectable face on the back of coins turns into statues of martyrs

Our dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
The railways, buses and taxis will run all the same
But one may not know the routes anymore

* Mong Kok is a famous district with lots of hawker stalls, but have changed massively because of the influx of PRC Chinese tourists

** A famous Buddhist quote

Hong Kong is still a Colony

Hong Kong is still a colony

This video was first uploaded on Youtube few weeks ago in Cantonese. English subtitle version is now available to help the fellow Hong Kongers who don’t speak Cantonese and the rest of the world understand what’s the CCP government doing to Hong Kong.

This bloke in the video is quite famous to netizens in Hog Kong. He’s famous for mocking the CCP-HKSAR government and producing clips that take the mickey out of politicians and has never been seen serious in front of camera.

1st Jan 2013 – Major protest in Hong Kong

This protest was first talked about by a bunch of netizens who detest China Government’s illegal (according to Basic Law and Sino-British Joint Declaration) influence in Hong Kong. These people started talking about a protest on the new year’s day back in around November 2012.

Unfortunately, various political parties heard about this protest and started taking credit for this by claiming that they initiated it. Those who are truly independent and initiated it were not happy about it but if these politicians and organisations genuinely want to make Hong Kong a better place and share the same view (Mr. CY Leung, the Chief Executive of HKSAR to step down, universal suffrage, and a referendum on people’s constitutions), there is nothing to worry about.

The truth is, demonstration has long been dominated by a handful of political organisations. Every march in Hong Kong follows the same routine: gather at Victoria Park (the largest public park on Hong Kong Island, which is close to the heart of the government HQ) , then walk along the main roads which will be blockaded by the police ahead of time, within a certain period of time people in the rally have to arrive at a designated protest zone -> the “organiser” announces that the demonstration is a success (yet what’s been achieved is always the question) and urges protesters to go home…

This is exactly why nothing ever results from the numerous protests in Hong Kong in the past 15 years – Hong Kong is a colony of the People’s Republic of China, which is communist, perhaps more preciously, dictatorship. No dictator would ever listen to its people unless riots and violent demonstration kicks off.

“If you make peaceful revolution impossible you make violent revolution inevitable” – J.F. Kennedy

Somehow, people in Hong Kong are always very proud of themselves for being “peaceful, rational, and non-violent” during demonstration. They condemn the slightest anomaly (e.g. shouting at the police so that they will allow people to continue to rally) in a rally.

The “protest” in the 1st January 2013 march were once again hijacked by a political organisation. It seems like no body dares to walk on the street without a couple of “leaders”. Unfortunately, given their standard formula of demonstration, it was a complete failure, once again. Nothing’s achieved, nothings changed.

This year, a very very different form of protest happened. Around a dozen or twenty people who were wearing Guy Fawkes masks marched down to the cross road in the middle of Central, the centre of the Hong Kong Island and the financial and business centre of the city-state.

They sit down in the middle of the cross-road on a public holiday during non peak hour, blockading two main roads to make a clear statement to Hong Kong people, SAR government and international media that they are no longer content with what’s happening to their home.

This is the reason I detailed the “standard way” of Hong Kong style demonstration earlier. This group of Vs (V for Vendetta) is not from any sort of organisation, and they have one thing in common – passionate about Hong Kong, their home. Here’s an impromptu statement given by one of them who holds a handheld amplifier gave on the spot. In short, he was raising the questions about why Hong Kong people are tolerating the SAR government’s incompetence.

Very soon, people who were walking on the street started shouting at the masked protesters:

“You have the right to protest, but you should protest outside the government headquarters!”
“It’s wrong to cause inconvenience to people who aren’t in the protest! If you want CY Leung to step down, go to the Government House and tell him!””You people have nothing better to do! A bunch of losers!”
“You are blockading the road making your point, and I can’t go home!”

I was watching all these and feeling heart broken – why are these people so blind? There is no violence involved in this demonstration, and yet people do not appreciate what some of them put their liberty and safety behind to fight for them? (One of them got arrested at the end)

There were some, however, who read about the masked protesters online (Facebook, online media, etc), and went down to support.

The masked protesters were soon surrounded by police – no more than 20 masked protesters and over 200 hundred police officers. The protesters were about to retreat and head for another spot, and one of them who was further away from the rest was tackled by at least one police officer like in a rugby game, and fall over.

Soon, other organised groups went to the same location. They had no choice because the police were blockading all the routes to the Government House, and all these routes were agreed by the police when the organisers applied for the demonstration. The police blockaded all the roads, which major traffic go by 24 hours, and soon one of the representatives of the police force went on TV and condemned the protesters for disrupting the peace. Kwok-Hung Leung (nickname: Long Hair), one of the Legislative Council members participated in numerous demonstrations, was surrounded by over 300 hundred police in the middle of the road on his own, and was later on charged for illegal assembly.

In different parts of Central, some of the protesters were trapped between police cordons, and one senior officer (recorded on tape) shouted at the protesters that “do not let them leave” and ordered his subordinates to surround the protesters.

VJMedia, an independent online media (relatively new), published a very detail and probably the most unbiased article illustrating the details of what exactly happened during the march. I’m not translating it here, but if i receive any request (even one!) I’ll translate it for the English readers.

Please leave your comments.

Freedoms erode – a blatant violation of the Basic Law and Sino-British Joint Declaration

In light of recent rapid decline in freedoms in Hong Kong, the people of Hong Kong must not stand and watch Hong Kong burn. That’s why Hong Kongers took it to the street and the demonstration on 1st January 2013 opened a new chapter of Hong Kong’s continuous battle for freedom and universal suffrage.

I believe that every human being is born free. Before I go into the details of the demonstration, it’s important for me to talk about how freedoms in Hong Kong erode after the handover of sovereignty in 1997.

In the Sino-British Joint Declaration and the Basic Law stated clearly that Hong Kongers’ freedoms are protected:

Sino-British Joint Declaration

(5) The current social and economic systems in Hong Kong will remain unchanged, and so will the life-style. Rights and freedoms, including those of the person, of speech, of the press, of assembly, of association, of travel, of movement, of correspondence, of strike, of choice of occupation, of academic research and of religious belief will be ensured by law in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. Private property, ownership of enterprises, legitimate right of inheritance and foreign investment will be protected by law.

The Basic Law

Article 27
Hong Kong residents shall have freedom of speech, of the press and of publication; freedom of association, of assembly, of procession and of demonstration; and the right and freedom to form and join trade unions, and to strike.

Article 28
The freedom of the person of Hong Kong residents shall be inviolable.

No Hong Kong resident shall be subjected to arbitrary or unlawful arrest, detention or imprisonment. Arbitrary or unlawful search of the body of any resident or deprivation or restriction of the freedom of the person shall be prohibited. Torture of any resident or arbitrary or unlawful deprivation of the life of any resident shall be prohibited.

The truth is, the freedoms we enjoy in Hong Kong is gradually being taken away. Not ripped from us all at the same time, but bit by bit…

News reports (over the past years) are clear evidence of these. A few recent news reports are used below to outline what’s been going on in Hong Kong. You’d notice that only one publication is quoted – this is another evidence of the self-censorship amongst the Hong Kong media. Note: some other publications follow up with these reports, and a number of them are relatively unbiased whilst some completely ignore any of the above and continue supporting the Hong Kong SAR government and the China government.

Apple Daily (8th Jan, 2013) “Limiting access to records of registered companies, stops media from investigating and confirming identities – harms public interest”

Investigative journalism is important to a free nation, where people are informed the stories that matter to their livelihood.

Apple Daily (1st Aug, 2012) – Mr Paul CHAN Mo-po, Secretary for Development, was found to own sub-division flats under a company (sub-division flats are illegal in Hong Kong). In light of this scandal, the government stopped the public, including journalists, from obtaining drivers’ identity via going through records of licence plate number. (Mr. CHAN, who’s also recorded in camera for drink driving, is free from any prosecution and charges Apple Daily (4th Oct, 2012))

Apple Daily (13th Dec 2012) – End of 2012, Apple Daily also exposed a massive scandal about “ditch oil” (basically “processed” used oil that’s dumped by restaurants (some even “collect” it from the drains, hence the name), it’s proven to be cancer causing and China has been producing and selling within China for years). The story revealed that a China company has been selling ditch oil to at least one Hong Kong distributor and many restaurant chains have been using such oil. This China company is owned by a State-Owned-Enterprise, which emerged in recent years and already became one of the largest (cooking) oil companies in the PRC.

When the newspaper further investigated the matter in China, the journalists were taken to the police in China and threatened they will not be welcome to China if they report the story. One of the China journalists who first uncovered the ditch oil in the first place was found dead with multiple stab wounds soon after the news was published. The ditch oil business is believed to be owned by the powerful.

Censorship in Hong Kong is not done by the government nor in the form of active involvement. With the number of newspaper in Hong Kong, only one or maybe two would report government’s inadequacy or scandals related to local government officials as well as the government in China.

I’ll follow with another piece about the 1st Jan 2013 demonstration, and media in Hong Kong once again were clearly categorised into two groups: pro-China (the majority) and pro-democracy (minority).

Please leave your comments.

2012 Report to Congress U.S.-CHINA ECONOMIC AND SECURITY REVIEW COMMISSION

I bumped into a Cantonese blog yesterday, and think this is a minor positive progress.

Approximately 30 pages in the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission Report are reporting on Hong Kong, a few key points are highlighted below:

1. Pro-Beijing parties enjoyed a financial advantage over their rivals, which enabled them to build extensive logistical networks to mobilize voters and exploit Hong Kong’s electoral peculiarities. (p.267)

2. Babies born in the territory enjoy the privileges of Hong Kong citizenship: access to the city’s superior health and education systems, and greater freedom to travel and settle inside and outside China.(p.267)

3. So-called ‘‘birth-tourism’’ quickly became a hot-button issue, with some going so far as to depict mainland Chinese as ‘‘locusts.’(p.268)

4. Censorship controversies at the South China Morning Post, one of Hong Kong’s most prominent newspapers, increased following the appointment of Wang Xingwei as editor-in-chief in January 2012. Mr. Wang, a former China Daily reporter, concurrently serves as a member of Jilin Province’s Political Consultative Conference, 424 a Chinese Communist Party-selected and -controlled organization. In June, he was accused of censoring coverage of the death of Li Wangyang, a well-known Chinese dissident. (p.270)

5. The city’s public schools were going to be required to begin teach- ing a course in ‘‘moral and national education’’ by 2015, which some called a thinly veiled ‘‘brainwashing’’ effort evocative of the Cultural Revolution.(p.272)

6. Beijing’s increasing influence in Hong Kong’s affairs calls into question the security of advanced technology products exported from the United States to Hong Kong.(p.273)

7. Congress reauthorize Section 301 of the U.S.-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992, which requires the U.S. secretary of State to submit an annual report to Congress on political, economic, and social developments in Hong Kong of relevance to the United States. This should include reporting on mainland interference in Hong Kong’s internal political affairs and Chinese efforts to leverage the territory as a platform for the internationalization of the RMB.(p.274)

8. Congress review the U.S.-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992 to deter- mine its continued applicability. In particular, Congress should review the security of advanced technology products exported from the United States to Hong Kong.(p.274)

9. Members of Congress, when visiting mainland China, also visit Hong Kong and that Congress encourage senior administration officials, including the secretary of State, to make visits to Hong Kong part of their travel.(p.274)

Glad to know that the US is monitoring Hong Kong closely, and I hope the US will actually react and stop the PRC from further interfering Hong Kong’s autonomy, and gradually Hong Kong can go independent!

Hong Kongers are NOT Chinese – Are you surprised?

Saw this link today, could be an interesting read to some: Hong Kongers are different from Chinese.

Many Hong Kongers (including myself) find it offensive when people ask if we are Chinese – the term Chinese in English language covers both ethnic and national meaning. However, in Chinese language 中國人 (direct translation: China-man, meaning Chinese national) refers to the ethnic Chinese who are in the PRC China; 華人 (direct translation: Hua-people, meaning ethnic Chinese, but they do not necessarily share the habits, life-style believes, history or behaviors of ethnic and national Chinese – e.g. British born Chinese).

This is an extremely complicated topic – including history of various countries, perceptions across the world, etc. I am no expert in anthropology (though I wish I was), sometimes I find it extremely difficult to explain to people. I hope I can write more about this in the near future.

I am struggling to find an example or a direct comparison… As I said before Hong Kong’s history is unique and fairly complicated. The closest example I could think of is: you say to someone from Gibraltar that he/she is Spanish; or go to Singapore and say “Singaporeans are Malay (or Chinese)”. They will be offended.

Please watch this clip, fast forward to 12’01 to hear the journalist’s question, and listen to Mr. Lee Kuan Yew’s answer.

Some said that Hong Kongers should not discriminate (PRC) Chinese – some condemn Hong Kongers’ “anti locusts ad” was a form of discrimination or racist act.

Please correct me if I’m wrong:

Discrimination according to Oxford Dictionary is “the unjust or prejudicial treatment of different categories of people, especially on the grounds of race, age, or sex“. Racist is “having or showing the belief that a particular race is superior to another”.

The anti locusts ad was merely stating the fact that Hong Kongers can no longer tolerate the China invasion/colonisation (want to write more about this but not in this post). Raising the awareness of fellow Hong Kongers about what consequences we are facing at the moment and what more to come if we continue to turn our back to the loophole in the Basic Law. Hong Kongers are demanding an amendment of the Basic Law – I prefer this notion to an “interpretation” by the PRC Government, which a direct interference of Hong Kong’s independent legal system, violating the 1-Country-2-System policy.

Government around the world amend their laws to suit the ever changing circumstances and environments. Why is the Hong Kong government so reluctant to amend the Basic Law?

I could only draw to one conclusion – The Hong Kong Government received direct order from the PRC government that the precedent of amending Basic Law must not be established (re-ensuring the absolute power PRC has over Hong Kong).