1st Jan 2013 – Major protest in Hong Kong

This protest was first talked about by a bunch of netizens who detest China Government’s illegal (according to Basic Law and Sino-British Joint Declaration) influence in Hong Kong. These people started talking about a protest on the new year’s day back in around November 2012.

Unfortunately, various political parties heard about this protest and started taking credit for this by claiming that they initiated it. Those who are truly independent and initiated it were not happy about it but if these politicians and organisations genuinely want to make Hong Kong a better place and share the same view (Mr. CY Leung, the Chief Executive of HKSAR to step down, universal suffrage, and a referendum on people’s constitutions), there is nothing to worry about.

The truth is, demonstration has long been dominated by a handful of political organisations. Every march in Hong Kong follows the same routine: gather at Victoria Park (the largest public park on Hong Kong Island, which is close to the heart of the government HQ) , then walk along the main roads which will be blockaded by the police ahead of time, within a certain period of time people in the rally have to arrive at a designated protest zone -> the “organiser” announces that the demonstration is a success (yet what’s been achieved is always the question) and urges protesters to go home…

This is exactly why nothing ever results from the numerous protests in Hong Kong in the past 15 years – Hong Kong is a colony of the People’s Republic of China, which is communist, perhaps more preciously, dictatorship. No dictator would ever listen to its people unless riots and violent demonstration kicks off.

“If you make peaceful revolution impossible you make violent revolution inevitable” – J.F. Kennedy

Somehow, people in Hong Kong are always very proud of themselves for being “peaceful, rational, and non-violent” during demonstration. They condemn the slightest anomaly (e.g. shouting at the police so that they will allow people to continue to rally) in a rally.

The “protest” in the 1st January 2013 march were once again hijacked by a political organisation. It seems like no body dares to walk on the street without a couple of “leaders”. Unfortunately, given their standard formula of demonstration, it was a complete failure, once again. Nothing’s achieved, nothings changed.

This year, a very very different form of protest happened. Around a dozen or twenty people who were wearing Guy Fawkes masks marched down to the cross road in the middle of Central, the centre of the Hong Kong Island and the financial and business centre of the city-state.

They sit down in the middle of the cross-road on a public holiday during non peak hour, blockading two main roads to make a clear statement to Hong Kong people, SAR government and international media that they are no longer content with what’s happening to their home.

This is the reason I detailed the “standard way” of Hong Kong style demonstration earlier. This group of Vs (V for Vendetta) is not from any sort of organisation, and they have one thing in common – passionate about Hong Kong, their home. Here’s an impromptu statement given by one of them who holds a handheld amplifier gave on the spot. In short, he was raising the questions about why Hong Kong people are tolerating the SAR government’s incompetence.

Very soon, people who were walking on the street started shouting at the masked protesters:

“You have the right to protest, but you should protest outside the government headquarters!”
“It’s wrong to cause inconvenience to people who aren’t in the protest! If you want CY Leung to step down, go to the Government House and tell him!””You people have nothing better to do! A bunch of losers!”
“You are blockading the road making your point, and I can’t go home!”

I was watching all these and feeling heart broken – why are these people so blind? There is no violence involved in this demonstration, and yet people do not appreciate what some of them put their liberty and safety behind to fight for them? (One of them got arrested at the end)

There were some, however, who read about the masked protesters online (Facebook, online media, etc), and went down to support.

The masked protesters were soon surrounded by police – no more than 20 masked protesters and over 200 hundred police officers. The protesters were about to retreat and head for another spot, and one of them who was further away from the rest was tackled by at least one police officer like in a rugby game, and fall over.

Soon, other organised groups went to the same location. They had no choice because the police were blockading all the routes to the Government House, and all these routes were agreed by the police when the organisers applied for the demonstration. The police blockaded all the roads, which major traffic go by 24 hours, and soon one of the representatives of the police force went on TV and condemned the protesters for disrupting the peace. Kwok-Hung Leung (nickname: Long Hair), one of the Legislative Council members participated in numerous demonstrations, was surrounded by over 300 hundred police in the middle of the road on his own, and was later on charged for illegal assembly.

In different parts of Central, some of the protesters were trapped between police cordons, and one senior officer (recorded on tape) shouted at the protesters that “do not let them leave” and ordered his subordinates to surround the protesters.

VJMedia, an independent online media (relatively new), published a very detail and probably the most unbiased article illustrating the details of what exactly happened during the march. I’m not translating it here, but if i receive any request (even one!) I’ll translate it for the English readers.

Please leave your comments.

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10 thoughts on “1st Jan 2013 – Major protest in Hong Kong

  1. I think this is one of the most significant info for me.
    And i’m happy studying your article. But wanna commentary on some general issues, The website style is great, the articles is in point of fact excellent : D. Good process, cheers

    • Thank you for the encouraging message. I’ll try to update this more often.

      Please feel free to let me know if there’s anything you’d like me to write about – too many issues going on, and I’m loosing focus! 🙂

      Thanks, and please come visit again!

  2. Its like you read my mind! You appear to know a lot about this, like you wrote the book in it or something. I think that you could do with some pics to drive the message home a little bit, but other than that, this is wonderful blog. A great read. I’ll certainly be back.

    • Thank you very much for your support. All I want is to increase awareness, and have the international world to see the reality of Hong Kong – a place that’s being ruined by the Communist PRC.

      We need to save ourselves, but also need help from the world to show us support – to learn that we are not alone in the road of freedom. Sharing this blog to your friends will be most wonderful and appreciated.

      I look forward to your return!

    • Hong Kong is dying, and yet people aren’t responding to these important issues and claim that politics is dirty. How frustrating!

      It worries me so much that Hong Kongers are so indifferent to what’s going on…

      Any idea of what I can do as an individual to help?

    • Thank you so much for your support. I look forward to seeing more visitors and please leave comments to help improve my blog.

      Please also feel free to let me know if there’s any particular topics in HK you’d like to read about, so I can write on them as well.

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