Hong Kong’s Democratic Movement – A Unique Protest Culture that Guarantees Success Never

Hong Kong’s Democratic Movement – A Unique Protest Culture that Guarantees Success Never

Source: Guardian

When one thinks of protest, one can picture that the people are unsatisfied by the government and have decided to take action over certain matters, to show the government (whether or not elected democratically by the people) that what it is doing is against the will of the people. Ultimately, the function of a protest is to make the government listen to the people, with the implicit threat that otherwise the people will make sure their demands are met – even if that means overthrowing the government.

We have seen thousands and thousands of protests in the world, and many end in bloodshed. It is no doubt sad but one has to pay a price for what one wants, and on the road to democracy and to freedom, prices often are high. Yes, blood will be shed, and yes those in power, democratically elected or not, will most certainly use propaganda to label the protests as “violent” or “irrational”. However, when a government goes against the peoples will’, or worse, betrays its people, the rational response is to behave “irrationally” – it is only human nature. After all, not all violence is visible and will directly cause death: bloodless violence does not mean that no harm is done. This type of violence carried out by a regime, or by people in power, will almost certainly trigger violence led by angry people – the people who no longer trust the government and doubt the credibility of those in power.

People protest with the aim of changing what is wrong in society. People want to make sure the changes happen. For better or worse, changes will bring new ideas to the regime, or even a new government that will listen to the people and respect their will. Demonstrations reinforce to those in power the fact that it is the people who give the government the privilege to serve, reminding the world of the foundations of democracy: A government is accountable to its people.

We have seen how Ukrainians rejected their government earlier this year. Of course we have all seen the videos of musicians playing music in front of fully-armed police troopers. Of course we have all watched the videos of Ukrainians explaining to the world what they are trying to achieve. All of these seemed peaceful and rational. However, when their voices were not heard, they marched on. They threw rocks at the police, who are supposed to be the servants of the people and protect the people, but instead were obeying a regime that ordered them to kill civilians. The police used their truncheons on the people, and snipers shot to kill.

The word “riot” is always used by governments seeking to bolster their own legitimacy in the face of a people who have decided that they will no longer accept their lies and betrayals! Words are amazing things: they control how the public see a certain issue, they plant ideas in our minds without us knowing, they are the best invention for those in power to continue brutality, and they are the killing machines which those who are high up deploy to manipulate the world’s point of view in the international arena.

In Hong Kong, the situation is completely different. Not that Hongkongers do not wish to have democracy, not that the government is less tyrannical than others, not that there are not protests. The key difference is the existence of “professional protesters”. These are those who take pains to appear to be helping Hongkongers on different issues: may it be broad topics like referendum and democracy, or local-scale issues like the construction of incinerators or the expansion of land-fills in certain areas. However, their goal is to take control (or hijack) the issue by representing the people. These people are high profile and are shape themselves as the frontline fighters in Hong Kong.

They violate the natural rules of protest. They promote peaceful, rational, non-(physically) violent and non-verbally-violent protests, but all these strictures apply only to protesters: That is to say that when the police use violence against protesters, they would tell protesters to remain non-violent and accept their fate – to be brutalised.

How do they do that? Let’s sum it up in a ten step routine they apply to EVERY PROTEST:

  1. An issue is brought up, and a small concern group is formed by the individuals being affected directly by the issue (e.g. Northeast New Territories Development Plan which will affect some villagers more directly than others, but it is important to acknowledge that the Plan will dissolve Hong Kong’s border which will lead to a catastrophic butterfly effect – so the issue is broader than it is being portrayed to the public)
  2. “Professional protesters” get involved and present themselves to be the approachable “protest experts” to the concern group
  3. When the “protest” comes around, the “professional protesters” will allow the concern group/the subject of the matter to speak on stage to attract more people and media, generating public support. These “protesters” will wait for the perfect moment, very patiently, sometimes days for days (e.g. the anti brainwashing-national-education-curriculum protest)
  4. When the moment comes, the “professional protesters” will take to the stage and hijack the protest
  5. The “professional protesters” will make a moving statement praising the concern group/affected individuals for their courage and determination to take the matter on, making everyone’s blood boil and bringing the atmosphere to a climax
  6. The “professional protesters” will then call for a photo opportunity for the media to take pictures to commemorate the event – a trophy for them, as their image as frontline fighters is reinforced once again
  7. They then will give the stage back to the concern group, and begin negotiating with them what the next step should be, behind the scenes. The group and the supporters will be left there to carry on chanting, shouting slogans, or worse, singing songs. They will talk the concern group down and the typical reasons they give to call it a day are, “we have achieved a great deal” (the ultimate goal is far from being achieved!), “you guys are really tired”, “the government and the public have heard our voice”, “let’s be strategic and focus our energy on our next move”, “the public is clearly on our side, look at the turnout!”
  8. The tired concern groups are talked down and their passion is weakened. Because of the “credibility” these “professional protesters” enjoy, the concern group believes in the key advice given by these “protest experts” – it is a long term game
  9. When they persuade the concern group successfully, the “professional protesters” retake the stage and announce on behalf of the concern group that, “we have made our voice heard today/tonight! We could not have done all this without you and the support of the people of Hong Kong, right? (every one shouts YEAH!)” and then, “let’s give ourselves a round of applause!”
  10. The “professional protesters” will then talk their way out and conclude the protest. The protest ends peacefully without challenging the regime, the government, the people in power – in fact the protest is concluded without achieving any of the goals originally set, let alone any demands being fulfilled.

Protests in Hong Kong end peacefully, every time, but no one ever asks why even though 99% of these protests preserve the status quo. No one follows up, and the “professional protesters” carry on looking for other topics and issues to dominate in order to build their reputations as the “face of democracy, and the power of the people” despite the fact that they have done, almost always, more harm than good.

Truth be told, people’s movements require no leader. Unfortunately, Hongkongers do not seem to be able to function without a leader in any circumstances – that is exactly why many Hongkongers began to use the term “Kong-sheep” to describe ourselves: desperate to follow.

In some recent occasions, anonymous protesters have volunteered to participate in protests even though the subject matter does not directly affect them. These protesters do not buy into the routine “professional protesters” practice throughout all these years, but believe that when the government is dysfunctional and can no longer be trusted, the people should overthrow it.

Source: Daily Telegraph

To Hong Kong’s eternal grief, these volunteers are always abandoned on-site without fail. The “professional protesters” will always stop them by taking the moral high grond: “this is not what the concern group wants! They want a peaceful and rational protest!” “Violence is bad in any circumstances (no matter what the government has done and what bloodless violence the regime has engaged in)!” All these may sound perfect at the point when a true peoples’ movement begins, but to a dictatorship or a government that is not accountable to its people, it is more than music to their ears!

Without disrupting the system by disobeying those in power, the people have zero chance to achieve what they demand – something these volunteering protesters understand. They are bold, but at the same time, they understand how corrupt the authorities and uniformed forces are. That is why they want to protect themselves with masks or cover – what we see as “black bloc” in many protests. However, the “professional protesters” will jump out to condemn these individuals as spies planted by the authorities and convince the “subjects of the protest (concern group)” to believe their story.

The individuals volunteering as protesters risk their personal safety for what they believe in, and for the concern group’s interests. However, they are being dismissed and often betrayed by the “professional protesters”.

Often times, lawmakers, who come across as being pro-democracy (a stand which once taken seems to lend a teflon quality to all adopters), are the first to condemn these “irrational acts” and even side with the authority to “prevent” any “violence” from happening again by endorsing the reinforcement of security around these events. Some even criticise protesters for wearing masks (surgical or otherwise Guy Fawkes masks) and demand that them surrender themselves to the police. If you read the news, you will find out who these people are.

Source: The Telegraph

Traitors of the people often come in disguise. Only when we realise who those traitors are can we break free from the burdens that have been laid on us all over the past decades, and really take control of the society that we want to make better.

If we continue to believe that the representatives in the legislative council will be able to resolve our problems, and lower our guard, we will be sold out. Because many of them, politicians or “experts”, are no different from the corrupt. Perhaps with the exception of the care with which they have painted their masks to gain the seats that you and I pay for.

Why Hong Kongers Feel So Strongly AGAINST Chinese/China?

For those who think Ms Alpais Lam was just a tiny incident that Hong Kongers overreacted and that Hong Kongers are nuts for fighting the communist and are jealous of Chinese for their wealth, please watch this video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkQbMhEQ6y8&feature=youtu.be

Honestly, China’s encroaching or invasion or whatever you like to call it is only going to accelerate!

Erasing HK Race – First Start with Killing Cantonese

According to the Statistics Department, the percentage of Hong Kongers who can speak Mandarin went up from 25% in 1996 to 50% last year, but the percentage of Hong Kongers who can speak Cantonese (our official language and mother tongue) fell!

China’s invasion or colonisation plan is progressive yet in massive scale:

- Make sure that the people of Hong Kong feel (or fear) that without China, Hong Kong cannot survive

- Once this concept is embedded in the majority of the Hong Kongers (in fact the whole world), they can begin ordering the HKSAR government to “promote” the importance of Mandarin

- If you’ve read ancient Chinese poems, especially Tong poems, you’ll find that they rhyme a lot better if you read them out in Cantonese than Mandarin. Mandarin, is really not a Chinese language, it is the language that was modified based on Manchurian’s mother tongue in Qing. The Chinese back in those days for some reasons prefer to change their own language and appearance (having queue – aka men’s ponytail), and call it “Chinese” so that they don’t feel as bad (Hey! they’re Chinese too, they didn’t invade us, it’s just a change of emperor). Nowadays, Chinese language is taught in Mandarin in HK! Even the government’s website has changed – official languages used to be (as far as I remember) Cantonese and English, but now it says Chinese and English. This may not really mean anything to the non-Chinese speaking community (as they’d say “Cantonese is Chinese too!”), but Cantonese is a language (UN already recognised it!) and that HKers’ mother tongue really is Cantonese. It’s almost like British learning French back in the old days because it’s “the upper class” language (not that Mandarin is upper class by any means) – ridiculous! English is no longer being valued these days, because the whole world is evolving around China, according to China and the western world and of course the HKSAR government. Also, China sees every single British heritage (in fact anything that’s related to the post-handover time) is a disgrace to them, they have no intention for HKers to speak good English – they don’t care if HKers lose their competitiveness because HKers are never one of the Chinese in their eyes. The result is the appalling standard of English, particularly the younger generation.

- Erasing your language is only the beginning. You must have read about how great China is when it comes to censorship. There’s a book on Hong Kong history, the (traditional) Chinese version is being censored and a revised version was published and all the “non-censored” copies were recalled. Now that the English standard is low, the Chinese version available is censored, the Hong Kongers is prevented from reading the real history. Clever, hey?

Another thing I want to point out is that, there are 150 (yes, one hundred fifty) Chinese from across the boarder who can immigrate to Hong Kong EVERY DAY! After 16 years, there are approximately 870,000 Chinese who now call themselves Hong Kongers. Bear in mind, though, Hong Kongers cannot get a China citizenship nor the PRC passport. 870,000 is around 12% of Hong Kong’s current total population!

Imagine, say for example, you’re American…

You walk into your local grocery store, the shop owner and staff there all speak to you in Spanish and when you ask them to speak English, they were in awe.

When you tell foreigners who’re visiting America that you’re from America, and he/she response “Isn’t America part of Mexico?” When you explain that they are two separate country (alright, Hong Kong isn’t independent yet, but give it time), “But your country’s soil is connected to the Mexican soil!”

When your government tell you, Spanish is very important because the amount of trade and the increasing number of Mexican immigrants, you need to accommodate them so all American have to adapt Spanish as their main language.

How’s that make you feel?

To make it worse, you are a loyal countryman, and pay tax on time, never ask anything from government (social benefits, etc), and because of the influx of immigrants who have low (or no) skills, and cannot find job in your country. Your government spend your tax money to provide these foreigners everything they need: medical, education, social welfare, etc. while you are earning so little that you could just pay tax and live a everything bear minimum life (don’t even think about buying a flat)… You call for help and complain about exploitation, these immigrants turn around and tell you “you have to accommodate us, we share the same ethnicity! You should speak our language too because we are so important to your country” and then apply their entire family and sometimes folks from the entire village to move into your country and do exactly the same thing.

Imagine all these have been happening in your country for 16 year. At start this happened slowly but now your neighbouring country is speeding this process up.

You become the minority of your country, yet have to support the majority who invade your country! Shouldn’t you stand up and tell the world that this cannot go on? Even shut down the government and gain your rights back and protect your children from suffering even more server consequences that await them?

Over and out.

Anchor Babies – A Little Thoughts…

Hong Kong is well known for being crowded, the living standard of the grass wood locals is unimaginable. Many live in cages, and some live in sub-diving flats where, in some cases, a family of four will be sharing a room of 30 sq. ft.

Chinese from all over China rush to Hong Kong to give birth to their babies. The parents of these anchor babies (which means neither of their parents are Hong Kong residents) argued that they only want the best for their children (because the education in China is too bad, according to them). However, they conveniently forget that the approval process of new immigrants applications from China is handled by China, not Hong Kong.

Some of them stay in Hong Kong (via travel visa) and apply for benefits from the Hong Kong social welfare! Luckily, the Hong Kong SAR government has changed the law – why should the tax payer be subsiding the people who took advantage of the system in Hong Kong and have the rest of their families move to HK and continue to take advantages and resources of Hong Kong.

When people of  Hong Kong suggest that these parents should have taken their children back to China – if raising children is so difficult! They make the excuses for not being able to help their children to apply for ID card in China (because of the one child policy). Shouldn’t they have thought about it before having the second child?

Parents of anchor babies also complain that the quality of life and the number of school spaces is not good enough for them. If you’re expecting to have a house this big (see picture below), you really can’t live on social benefits – not many people can afford houses like this in Hong Kong!

.RTHK

For school spaces, have you heard about the local students who have to travel over an hour away from their home to go to school everyday? It’s all because of the anchor babies forcing the locals to move to another district for school. The facilities and education systems are designed for the people of Hong Kong and can only accommodate the expected population growth in HK…

They keep saying that they are under a lot of pressure living in Hong Kong, but why can’t they move back to their home town? If Hong Kong is such a difficult place for you to live and there’s a much easily and comfortable life waiting for you in China, why insist on staying in Hong Kong?

The problem is spreading to the US and many other Western countries too. I recently read that Canada is considering to change its law to stop anchor babies from getting citizenship.

Good luck, world. Look at Hong Kong’s situation, you’ll probably learn a thing or two before embracing China’s expansionism…

Attack on Titan/ Attack on China?

Attack on Titan is a Japanese comic series and recently made into anime. The series has gain substantial popularity in Hong Kong (as well as in Japan, I’d think).

Many in HK find the story line matches the situation in Hong Kong, hence they created the video below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ToGqN2M5NrY

Cantonese lyrics with English subtitle.

Enjoy.

Over and out

ANGRY! 70% of Students in HK’s Universities are Mainland Chinese!!!

I do not suppose anyone would disagree that universities in Hong Kong should give priority to Hong Kong students.

In Hong Kong, the number of students from China has been growing while the number of spaces for the local Hong Kong students has been stagnant. Bear in mind the fact that these universities are partly funded by the Hong Kong SAR government, which means tax payers in Hong Kong are funding foreign students.

The latest statistics show that an alarming 70% of the postgraduate students in the universities in Hong Kong are Chinese from Mainland China. These universities explain that recruiting foreign students is a way to internationalise their schools. However, the so called “internationalisation” is misleading! A truly internationlised university should have students from all over the world, which is what universities in Hong Kong used to be, but not from ONE SINGLE COUNTRY.

The majority of these so called “international” students from China have the traditionally Chinese mentality – refuse to emigrate into the local society nor would they embrace the local culture, criticise Hong Kong and the people of Hong Kong, victimise themselves when they provoke public outcry. Here are a few blog posts by another blogger about these students from China:

City University incident

Student from China Calls HKer DOGS

Poly U China Students Hates HK

One thing I want to say is if these students from China despise their host universities and their host country (Hong Kong) and if China is such a wonderful place in all aspects, why did they CHOOSE to come to Hong Kong to study? Why did they CHOOSE to work in Hong Kong after they graduated? All they want is the Hong Kong identity cards or use Hong Kong as a platform for them to immigrate to other countries!

Hong Kong students are working on raising fund to place advertisements in newspapers. Below are the first round of designs, you can also visit the Facebook group which was set up a while ago:

Image

ImageImage

There have been numerous cases that clearly shows these universities favours students from China. The banners they put up in the campuses are in Simplified Chinese instead of the official written language – Traditional Chinese. Announcements are written with China terminologies. There’s a case recently reported by the press which was extremely controversial (also shows how ungrateful those Chinese students could be, CY Leung helped him to get his degree, and he turned around and said CY Leung would unlikely to uphold justice during his tenure as Hong Kong SAR’s Chief Executive).

Another thought: The world is getting really confused about how to differentiate between Hong Kongers and Chinese, sometimes they mixed Taiwanese up with Chinese as well! I can honestly say, this would insult the genuine Taiwanese and Hong Kongers who have their national pride.

PLA Takes Land in Central – HKSAR Government as Accomplice

freehongkong:

The China government is wasting no time in “conquering” Hong Kong! After live ammunition military exercise in Hong Kong, they want to build military facilities in our land too! If it wasn’t for a small hand full of less biased media in HK, this would have gone without anybody noticing!
You can email to tpbpd@pland.gov.hk to express your view (hopefully to object it), or use this link (only works on IE) https://pub31.tpb.gov.hk/pems/Representation.html?id=HsRR7mqbvQOUoN0DMKQhOoMKTMqmh%2Bqi

Originally posted on The Real Hong Kong News:

The House News

15th April 2013

<PLA Takes Land in Central – HKSAR Government as Accomplice>

解放軍中環搶地政府幫兇

The majority of the people of Hong Kong have no idea that the HKSAR government is planning to allocate a plot of 30,000 sq. ft. land at the Central Promenade to the People’s Liberal Army (PLA) for military use. The HKSAR government has submitted the amendments to the Town Planning Board, and today (15th April 2013) is the last day for public to submit their comment on the amendments. Once the amendment of the outline zoning plan is approved, the PLA will have the right to build a military facility that is ten meters tall with a total surface area of 100,000 sq. ft. without getting approval from the Town Planning Board nor having public consultation. This facility will be around 200 meters away from the Tamar Park and the…

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Yang Kuang’s “Disapperance” HK Journalists Being Attacked in China

Mr. Yang Kuang (Why Yang), a Hong Kong activist, disappeared for 41 hours in China when he tried to visit his friend Liu Xia, wife of Liu Xiao Bo (Nobel Peace Prize winner).

He was then “sent home” by PRC China on 10th March 2013. No assistance was given to Mr. Yang during his “disappearance” and Mr. CY Leung, the Chief Executive, responded to the press’ enquiry that the government has not received any request for assistance.

Hong Kong journalists who went follow the story were beaten up by 4-5 men outside the residential area, which is public space, of Mrs. Liu’s flat.

A video filmed by Now TV (a local paid TV channel) shows part of the incident – the journalists being attacked are from Now TV, RTHK, TVB, Commercial Radio,

A TVB reporter talked about the incident here. According to the reporter, these 4-5 men rushed over to the journalists and started to beat them up right away. The police arrived after the journalists called for help, but they did not arrest any of the attackers and told the journalists that they should not ask any questions about the attackers. The TVB reporter also said that her reporter identity card was taken away.

Mr. Ma Fung-Kwok, HK Deputy to the National People’s Congress, commented on the incident that “When in Rome do as the Romans do” and said that the key is whether the Hong Kong journalists were covering the story legally.

Mr. CY Leung, the Chief Executive, said reporters should be protected and respected as they cover stories legally.

Public outcry in Hong Kong for thorough investigation, and condemn PRC/China for their barbarian actions. The HK Journalists Association also expressed their fury against the attack.

These “ordinary men” are suspected to be plainclothes police – one of them was recognised by the media as a PRC policeman.

Queen’s Road East – 90’s Canto-Pop

Queen’s Road East is a Canto-pop written in 1991, when Hong Kong’s future was determined by the British government and PRC government where Hong Kong people had absolutely no say. This song reflects the confusion of Hong Kongers and our fear for the Communist and PRC. If you watch the MTV carefully, you’d notice there are scenes of people and cars moving backward, a metaphor to symbolism that Hong Kong will go backward after the handover of sovereignty.

The lyrics is full of metaphor. Strongly illustrating Hong Kongers desperation and helplessness about our future.

Hope you’d enjoy the MTV and the lyrics translated below:

Queen’s Road West and Queen’s Road East
Queen’s Road East turns into Queen’s Road Central
Queen’s Road Central is crowded with people

Our royal friend is on the back of coins
Forever young and named the Queen
Follows me everywhere to do all sorts of trade
With an expressionless face that represents success

A dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
Where properties are available everywhere, people carry on buying and selling
But Mong Kok* may have to change its name

This rightful friend is familiar and friendly
Hence, allowing horses to race only twice a week
People, therefore, naturally compete to cross the finishing line
If you wish to be a citizens of the great nation, all it requires is money

Our dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
The hot and cold weather still affects this city
But we may have to seek help from people with supernatural power for a change of weather

Emptiness is form, form is emptiness**
Emptiness is form, form is emptiness…

This beautiful friend says goodbye in class
The same picture shown on TV every night
When the day of celebration comes, everyone has to applause
The respectable face on the back of coins turns into statues of martyrs

Our dear friend leaves this big city and says goodbye
Have to rely on the comrades to create new ideas
The railways, buses and taxis will run all the same
But one may not know the routes anymore

* Mong Kok is a famous district with lots of hawker stalls, but have changed massively because of the influx of PRC Chinese tourists

** A famous Buddhist quote

HK Primary School Material: Cannot Call Onself Hong Konger – HK Newspaper

After the massive anti National & Moral Education Curriculum that forced the Hong Kong SAR government to “shelved” the curriculum, Ming Pao reveals on 3rd March 2013 that Hong Kong schools are brain washing primary school kids via different text books.

Summary of the article below:

Although the National & Moral Education is not a standalone subject in Hong Kong anymore after the months long protest led by Scholarism (formulated by school children), a lot of content about “identifying one’s recognition of China” is penetrating various subject in primary school subjects, including Chinese language, general studies and Mandarin.

Parents’ Concerns Group reviewed the top three most popular sets of primary school text books in Hong Kong and found that some materials deliberately emphasis the “expression of emotions”. A chapter called “Metaphor of Motherland”, one of the primary 5 Chinese language chapters, included a “patriotic poem”. The teacher handbook of this chapter says that teachers should instruct students to “use sonorous tone to slowly read the poem aloud, when reading out the character ‘country’, the final note of of the character should be lengthen (note: in Cantonese, as well as other Chinese languages, this means a strong emphasis of a term/word) in order to show one’s admiration and respect to the country (i.e. China)”. Another chapter described China’s national flag as something “that will listen attentively (to students)”.

In a General Studies textbook for primary 1 to 5 students, when it described the established of People’s Republic of China (PRC), it only sketchily mentioned Mao Zidong, the Chairman of China’s Communist Party found the PRC which became strong after many years. It omitted all the tragedies happened in between, including the Cultural Revolution and 4th June incident (also known as “Tiananmen Square massacre”).

In a primary 2 English General Studies textbook, when it explains nationality, the teacher handbook listed clearly that students should NOT called themselves “Hong Kong People” (i.e. Hong Kongers/Hong Kongese): “Many children call themselves HK people but this is not a correct concept. One should say “I am a Chinese citizen living in HK (direct quote from the handbook)“. Concern Group questioned that the teacher handbook clearly pointed out that “HK people” is a politically incorrect concept, and deny the identify of Hong Konger.

The chairman of a teachers group focuses on Liberal Studies in HK said that the evaluation forms of many study tours that go to China (PRC) focus on how students’ perception of China (PRC) change after the tours, but do not cover students’ genuine impressions.